Complete Listing of Discovery Learning
Apprenticeships by Major

Please note that this list is sorted by major; students from other majors may still be able to apply for the projects. If there are no apprenticeships listed, please check back soon for updates, as listings change frequently.

PLEASE NOTE: We are aware that many of the links in apprenticeship descriptions are broken if you click on them directly. Please copy and paste links into your web browser if you have problems viewing them.


To view projects listed by department, select "Apprenticeships by Department" at left.

Projects for Aerospace Engineering Sciences

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
AES - Satellite-based navigation (GPS/GNSS) for satellites Dennis Akos

dma@colorado.edu







Project involves development of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for space-based vehicles. Working with local industry, graduate students, and professor to develop next generation GPS receivers - as well as receivers capable of processing signals from similar systems (Russia's GLONASS, EU's Galileo, and China's Compass). Project involves all elements from antenna, through the radio components, the signal processing, the position solution and orbit determination elements. Students can get involved with any or all of the specific aspects of the project. Please contact Dennis Akos (dma@colorado.edu) to discuss further or if you just have any questions. Thanks!!


US citizen, solid programming skills (wiht Matlab, Python, and/or C), junior or senior standing
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - GPS/GNSS Receiver Design for Space Applications Dennis Akos

dma@colorado.edu







Project involves development of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for space-based vehicles. Working with local industry, graduate students, and professor to develop next generation GPS receivers - as well as receivers capable of processing signals from similar systems (Russia's GLONASS, EU's Galileo, and China's Compass). Project involves all elements from antenna, through the radio components, the signal processing, the position solution and orbit determination elements. Students can get involved with any or all of the specific aspects of the project. Would welcome participation summer 2014 if available/interested! Please contact Dennis Akos (dma@colorado.edu) to discuss further or if you just have any questions. Thanks!!


US citizen, solid programming skills (with Matlab, Python, and/or C), junior or senior standing
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Cubesat Orbit Analysis–Use TLEs to characterize orbit evolution and conjunctions Penina Axelrad
(303) 492-8183
penina.axelrad@colorado.edu







New cubesat and nanosat programs are underway internationally involving university students and professionals. These efforts are sure to increase because of the low cost of entry, increasing number of standardized components and launch opportunities for cubesats as secondary payloads. In the U.S. interest in cubesats by universities, NASA, NSF, and the DoD is growing because of their potential to provide a much lower cost means for making valuable measurements for scientific, commercial, and national security applications. With the proliferation of cubesats, it is critical to understand their orbital characteristics, how long they will remain on-orbit, and any threats they may present in creating space debris and the potential for collisions with other existing satellites. The project is to gather a history of existing cubesat launches and evaluate using publicly available two-line-element data, their past and expected orbital evolution and perform a conjunction analysis using online and STK capabilities to better understand collision likelihoods. These results will provide important insights that will aid future research on ground-based satellite tracking


http://www.celestrak.com/SOCRATES/
Students must have working knowledge of MATLAB and STK for use in analyzing orbits at the level of ASEN3200. Current juniors in Aerospace Engineering Sciences, or students at other levels or from other departments who have gained this knowledge through individual study or work experience are eligible.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Feature identification in 3D Time-of-Flight Camera images for navigation Penina Axelrad
(303) 492-8183
penina.axelrad@colorado.edu





Jay McMahon

The DLA student will work with faculty and a graduate student who are developing estimation strategies for spacecraft autonomous rendezvous, approach, and docking (AR&D). The current simulation assumes that observed features of the target can be matched perfectly with known features identified in satellite drawings. To make the simulation more realistic and to incorporate actual measurements, we are looking for a student to develop the tools to automatically extract features that are most beneficial for AR&D, and work with experimental data from a 3D IR Camera that provides ranging measurements for each pixel in the image.


Students must have expertise in image processing toolbox in MATLAB or Python, basic knowledge of Solidworks or other CAD tool, and general programming skills in one of these languages.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
EnEd - Engineering Student and Alumni Perspectives on Social Responsibility Angela Bielefeldt
(303) 492-8433
angela.bielefeldt@colorado.edu

Greg Rulifson

Gregory.Rulifson@colorado.edu



A continuing study funded by the NSF to understand how engineers view social responsibility, from students through the workforce. The research combines quantitative survey data with qualitative information from open-ended survey questions and interviews. The study is expanding from 5 schools and 3 engineering majors to ~30 schools and all engineering majors.


None
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Smart Materials/Electronic Textiles for Wearable Technology and Novel Interfaces Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
ncorrell@colorado.edu

Halley Profita

halley.profita@colorado.edu


(303) 717-1436
Student will help in the development of novel textile forms of wearable technology using microcontrollers and networked hardware. New form factors, gesture interfaces, and smart material construction will be explored. We would like to develop smart materials and interaction techniques (wearable technology) for multiple applications including military, art, assistive technology, music, etc.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
Would like: Programming or electronics skills Would like: Machining, CAD, building/shop, or fabrication skills
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Smart Materials/Electronic Textiles for Wearable Technology and Novel Interfaces Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu

Halley Profita

halley.profita@colorado.edu



Student will help in the development of novel textile forms of wearable technology using microcontrollers and networked hardware. New form factors, gesture interfaces, and smart material construction will be explored. We would like to develop smart materials and interaction techniques (wearable technology) for multiple applications including military, art, assistive technology, music, etc.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=2353
GEEN 1400 Would like: Programming or electronics skills Would like: Machining, CAD, building/shop, or fabrication skills
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Distributed Algorithms for Reconfigurable Self-Organizing Smart Wall Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu

Nicholas Farrow

nicholas.farrow@colorado.edu



The focus of this apprenticeship is to investigate controlling large scale swarm robotic structures by programming swarm algorithms at the individual node level. The student will be working with the lab's Amorphous Facade project which uses reconfigurable hexagonal blocks for the swarm nodes. The student will investigate various algorithms and methods of routing data and control signals between nodes, creating distributed user interfaces, as well programming the nodes to predict user behaviors. There will be many opportunities for the student to choose their own research path with this project, as well as to develop new block types for integration with the current library of blocks.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=574
Some experience with basic electronics and microcontroller programming will be helpful, but are not required. Experience with C/C++ programming is required.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CS - Multilayer composite materials with embedded sensing and distributed computation Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
ncorrell@colorado.edu







Our group has developed a small scale distributed computing platform (less than 1in2) that is equipped with an Atmel Xmega microcontroller, an accelerometer, LEDs and other sensors, and can be networked with up to four neighbors to create large lattices of microcontrollers. We wish to investigate integrating this network into composites to create, e.g., airplane wings that can measure windspeed and forces across them. The DLA will work with grad students in our lab to experiment with composite materials, test them for durability, and collect experimental data, e.g., in the ITLL wind tunnel.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
Experience in making your own glass and carbon fiber composites is advantageous.
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Tissue biomechanics - relating microstructure, composition and function Virginia Ferguson
(303) 735-5232
virginia.ferguson@colorado.edu

TBD TBD





The DLA student in this position will be tasked with evaluating the mechanical properties of biological tissues collected from mice. The student will also perform assays to evaluate tissue biochemistry and microscopy to determine how the constituents and organization of the structural matrix within the tissue (the extracellular matrix) contributes to the overall tissue mechanical behavior. A major component of this DLA project will include development of a novel mechanical testing method and writing Matlab code to evaluate the resulting mechanical testing data. Students with knowledge of numerical methods and analysis, familiarity with Solidworks and the principles of engineering design, and the basics of mechanics of solids (such as beam bending, moments of inertia, etc.) is highly desired.


https://sites.google.com/a/colorado.edu/bbl/
Junior or senior in mechanical engineering or similar discipline; completed courses in Statics, Mechanics of Solids; possess some Matlab programming experience. It is highly desired that students must be able to work in 2 five hour blocks per week. It is preferable that the student has taken a college level physiology or biology course.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
ECEE - Solar Forecasting Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu





Kim Newman
(303) 735-2287
Kimberly.Newman@colorado.edu
To optimally manage power grids energized by either dense or distributed photovoltaic (PV) sources at high levels of grid integration it is necessary to predict the direct and diffuse solar flux in near real time from a few minutes to several hours ahead and at high spatial resolutions of up to ~0.5 km. This project addresses these needs through the development and field demonstration of an optimized cloud and solar intensity (“insolation”) forecasting system based on both distributed ground-based sensors using smart phones and in situ PV power monitoring of solar array output. The system will provide real-time prediction of insolation on time and space scales relevant for operational power grid management. The system is being built and demonstrated in Boulder using deployable sensors developed under two CU capstone projects and funded by the CU Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute. Interest in field experimentation, sensor development, and weather forecasting, clouds, and renewable energy is important.


Interest in weather, use of smart phones, and renewable energy
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Remote Sensing from Unmanned Aircraft for Agriculture Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu

Eryan Dai
(303) 459-4266
eryan.dai@gmail.com

Maciej Stachura
(720) 335-7558
maciej.stachura@blackswifttech.com
CU and Black Swift Technologies are embarking upon a Phase II project involving development, testing, and field validation of a small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) with a highly capable passive microwave radiometer to provide soil moisture measurements over an area of up to ~400 acres per flight. Tight integration of the sensor with the sUAS avionics and airframe will enable precise flight control for low altitude missions in the range of 15m-30m above ground level (AGL) required for the sensor to accurately map soil moisture down to ~5cm in depth at up to a 15m resolution for agricultural purposes. Phase II involves building a modified removable nose cone for the UAS to house the sensor payload and converts the propulsion to a twin prop design on the wings. Phase II also includes the design of several new technologies, including a lightweight and low cost sensor board to measure both the infrared temperature of the ground and the Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI) and high speed mass memory based on SD RAM cards. The project will involve supporting the development and testing of these sensors and memory along with general help in integrating them into the UAS.


http://cet.colorado.edu
Interest in unmanned aircraft and environmental remote sensing. ECEN 3400 and 3410 are desirable.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Terahertz Radio Wave Propagation Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu

Larry Scally

Larry.Scally@coloradoengineeringinc.com



The focus of this project is a study of how electromagnetic waves in the frequency range from ~100 to 1000 GHz ("terahertz radio waves") propagate through the atmosphere. Specifically, we are interested in the impact of atmospheric turbulence and the associated fluctuations in the index of refraction in the air caused by this turbulence on the coherency of waves propagating across distances of kilometers. To study these effects CU has developed the Terahertz Atmospheric Ionospheric Propagation, Absorption, and Scattering" (TAIPAS) experiment. This experiment consists of a 325-340 GHz transmitter from the ECEE building to receivers at the Green Mesa site, and includes weather instrumentation, an optical scintillometer, and a radio telecommunications link. This project solicits help in running the TAIPAS system and in collecting and analyzing the data from the TAIPAS transmissometer, telescopes, and weather sensors. An interest in radio waves and experience in using Linux and Windows computers is important for this work.


http://cet.colorado.edu
ECEN 3400 and ECEN 3410 are important for this work.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CHBE - Design of Polymer Materials Capable of Signaling Their Own Mechanical Failure Andrew Goodwin
(303) 492-3573
andrew.goodwin@colorado.edu






(303) 492-3573
In the Goodwin Research Group, we explore the effect of chemical properties on the physical properties of colloids (droplets, bubbles, and particles) and polymer materials. For example, is it possible to design polymer materials that tell their user when they are wearing out, or even undergo automatic self-healing procedures? To design such materials, we are studying the effect of mechanical stimulation (e.g. stretching, twisting, cutting) on the chemical structures within the material. The student who works on this project will team with a graduate student or postdoctoral researcher to design polymer materials with pre-programmed mechanical properties on large and small scales. In doing so, the student will gain hands-on experience with chemical and materials synthesis and microscopy for characterization, and successful research results will be incorporated into journal publications.


http://www.colorado.edu/chbe/andrew-p-goodwin
Must have completed at least one semester of Organic Chemistry lecture and lab.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Custos - Building a System for Secure Digital Data Storage and Access Control Dirk Grunwald
(720) 310-5430
dirk.grunwald@colorado.edu

Andy Sayler
(617) 299-1597
andy.sayler@colorado.edu



The magnitude of the digital data we create, store, and interact with on a daily basis is rapidly increasing. Simultaneously, we are demanding increasingly diverse use cases for our data: from syncing it across a variety of devices to sharing it with a multitude of collaborators. Securing our data and controlling who can access it is thus increasingly important, but also increasingly difficult. In order to create simpler system for securing and managing our digital data, we are building Custos: a key:value object store with a flexible authentication layer and powerful access control semantics. We are seeking a student to help us continue the design and development of the Custos software ecosystem. This role would involve designing and building software as part of the larger Custos project. There are multiple development areas within Custos (e.g. file system work, web front-end work, etc), and we are willing to work with the student to pick an area that they feel most interested in working on. Custos is Free Software and all submissions will be released under a FLOSS license. Questions? Contact Andy Sayler (andy.sayler@colorado.edu). Details at http://www.andysayler.com/output/.


http://www.andysayler.com/output/
+ Moderate to Advanced Programming Experience (ideally Python, C, and/or Go) + Basic Operating System Knowledge (ideally Linux) + Basic Computer Security Knowledge (desirable, but not required) + Basic Cryptography Knowledge (desirable, but not required) + Basic File System Knowledge (desirable, but not required) + Web Programming Experience (optional) + Linux Kernel Programming Experience (optional)
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - Forecasting construction injuries using predictive analytics Matthew Hallowell
(303) 704-8523
matthew.hallowell@colorado.edu






(303) 704-8523
This apprenticeship will focus on using past injury reports to forecast the probability of future injuries in new construction environments. The study will involve using data from past injuries to assess future risk. The methods we will use are similar to those used to predict weather. We will also explore how to integrate data into virtual design and construction computer models. This project will involve working in a team of at least 3 researchers. The official hypothesis and project description are as follows. The research objective of this project is to test the hypothesis that over half of the variability in construction injury statistics can be explained by a few inherent and basic attributes of construction environments. Predictor attributes will be identified by studying measurable patterns in US construction injury reports and the resulting dataset will be reduced to principal attributes using multivariate statistics. Principal attributes will be related to the probability of injury occurrence in mathematical models and the underlying hypothesis will be validated by comparing the predictions of these models with actual project outcomes.


www.safetylaboratory.org
Probability and Statistics course preferred.
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
ECEE - Geomathematics and Remote Sensing Ute Herzfeld
(303) 492-9066
ute.herzfeld@colorado.edu







The topic of research is development and implementation of algorithms for analysis of remote sensing data. The geomathematics and remote sensing group is an active and interdisciplinary group with students from several majors. Applications are in new satellite instrumentation, including NASA's future mission, ICESat-2 and range to analysis of airborne and field data collected by us (including undergraduate students) in Alaska over Bering Glacier. While most of the day-to-day work is computational (code development, mathematical data analysis), applications are in glaciers and ice streams, sea ice, ecology, atmosphere and other parts of the Earth system. Students work together with grad students,other undergraduates and the faculty advisor, who is a Research Professor in ECEE, a Senior Research Associate at CIRES and an affilaite Professor in APPLIed Math. This is a great opportunity to learn about research, get experience and - if interested - find a topic for a Masters or PhD Thesis or present a paper.


Solid background in maths/applied maths and experience in coding/ computer programming. Interest in satellite remote sensing and snow & ice research and other Earth Sciences and Geophysics (Alaska, Greenland and Antarctica). Python, Matlab, C. High GPA and high dedication to academic work; enjoy working in a team (of professor and students). Available to work in blocks of at least 3 hours.
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
mostly computer related, coding/analysis, but also field based
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Software-Defined Networking Eric Keller
(303) 492-0125
eric.keller@colorado.edu







A software-defined network runs network management services as software on a logically-centralized controller that uses a standard API (instead of proprietary, vendor-specific interfaces) to install packet-handling rules in the underlying network devices (e.g., switches). This offers offers unprecedented control over the data network and has been shown to be an architecture which is programmable and evolvable, and seen some great early success stories (Google’s backbone network is controlled this way). This project is not a single, specific project, but a category of projects that can go in a number of direction related to a number of ongoing research projects in the Next-generation Networks Group run by Professor Keller, and will be based on the student’s interests. Some topics included applications to cloud computing, integration of software-defined networking controllers in operating systems, extending the network edge into applications, namely streaming analytic platforms such as Storm, and enabling an agile network and computer security system which actively seeks out information, learns of threats, and dynamically modifies the network in response.


http://ngn.cs.colorado.edu/
None
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Space Weather: Origins of satellite disturbances in the auroral zone Delores Knipp
(303) 492-2393
delores.knipp@colorado.edu

Robert Redmon
(303) 497-4331
Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov



Earth’s high latitudes are the location of otherworldly auroral displays and intense electrical currents. Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) spacecraft have revealed new relationships between the solar emissions and the response of the upper atmosphere. This project aims to unite three data sets from LEO spacecraft that relate particles and field variations in Earth’s upper atmosphere to energy supplied by the solar wind. During the 2013-2014 Academic Year a DLA researcher successfully merged LEO spacecraft data from a database at the University of Texas at Dallas space-data portal and similar, but more coarsely-processed, data at the National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder to create an extended, quality-flagged database for electric fields measurements at the atmosphere-space interface. The new effort will involve 1) additional data processing and quality-checking and 2) the marriage of the electric field, magnetic field and particle data to produce an energy deposition estimate along the track of the LEO satellites. Our intent is to make these data available for worldwide use in a NASA supported virtual observatory. Once the database is created, we will study features that may enhance satellite drag or create other spacecraft perturbations in the context of past and novel space weather activity parameters.


Availability to work in 2 5-hr blocks would be useful. Some work will be conducted at NOAA's David Skaggs Research Center at 825 Broadway in Boulder. Must be US citizen or green card holder Must pass background check for access to NOAA facility Should have an interest in space-related physical science Should be familiar with general logic for database searches. MATLAB or IDL experience would be helpful
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Climate Monitoring Using Reconstructed Sea Level and Satellite Altimetry Robert Leben
(303) 492-4113
leben@colorado.edu







Student will help develop a website hosting climate indices derived from reconstructed sea level and optimally interpolated altimetry datasets from 1850 to present. Climate indices will be developed to represent ocean climate signals such as El Nino and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, as well as indices for monitoring variability in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The student will help to generate these indices and make them publicly available on a dedicated website. These indices will be used to monitor major patterns of climate variability with significant societal impacts, and will provide talking points for outreach to the general public about climate variability and climate change.


http://eddy.colorado.edu/ccar/data_viewer/index
None
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
AES - Autonomous Systems Development for Unmanned Aircraft James Mack
(303) 704-5464
James.Mack@Colorado.EDU





Eric Frew
(303) 735-1285
Eric.Frew@colorado.edu
The Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) is seeking an undergraduate student to assist with the development of autonomous systems for unmanned aircraft. The student will work with an existing team of faculty and graduate students to further RECUV’s current unmanned aircraft systems. Our area of research is combining sensing with autonomous decision-making in unmanned aircraft. The student would be expected to fill one or more of the following roles: Embedded Systems: * Specification and assembly of embedded systems and sensors * Programming and setup of systems to acquire and communicate sensor data * Setup communications systems to between devices Unmanned Aircraft: * Construction of unmanned aircraft and setup of unmanned aircraft avionics * Integration of sensors into unmanned aircraft Software and Computer Systems: * Develop software to support hardware user interfaces. * Develop software for autonomous navigation * Develop software to manage operational data and activities All students will be expected to support their particular subsystems during field operations in and around Boulder County.


http://recuv.colorado.edu/research.html
Students should have at least one 3-hour block free per week to support field operations. The following skills are particularly beneficial to this position. Experience in multiple disciplines is preferred. Unmanned Aircraft: * Aviation and aerodynamics, including full sized aviation * Unmanned aircraft, including R/C planes * Flight controllers (autopilots, gyros) Electronics: * Sensors and data acquisition * Computer systems architecture * Embedded systems (microcontrollers, arduino, raspberry pi, etc.) * Wireless communication Fabrication/mechanical: * Ability to machine or specify machined parts * Composites design and construction * Woodworking tools and methods * Mechanical components and standard hardware Software: * Linux (use and programming) * C/C++ * Scripting languages (Python, shell scripts, etc.) * Data translation * Computer systems architecture * Networking and communications protocols
Very little supervision; student will need to work largely independently
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
EnEd - Can We Talk? Impacting student retention through facilitated conversations LaRuth McAfee
(303) 492-8809
laruth.mcafee@colorado.edu







This project seeks to understand and improve retention and success of undergraduate engineering students through facilitated discussions. Studies show that dialogues improve relationships and foster collaboration between students of different backgrounds, and increase students’ self-awareness. These outcomes all support student success and retention, and this project seeks to investigate dialogues at CU Engineering. As a new project, initial activities will include literature research on facilitated discussions, with a special focus on the impact on underrepresented minority and women engineering students. After laying this groundwork, further activities will include pilot studies on facilitated dialogues. Meeting regularly, you will assist in clarifying research questions, reviewing literature, developing instruments for new data collection, and collecting/analyzing existing and new assessment data to identify key aspects of facilitated dialogues that impact retention and success in engineering. Working with two researchers associated with the BOLD Center and the ITLL, you will learn to implement and analyze a variety of engineering education research methods.


None
Very little supervision; student will need to work largely independently
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily theoretical, most work on paper/electronic medium
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Range Sensor Testing and Usage for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation Jay McMahon
(303) 492-3944
jay.mcmahon@colorado.edu





Eric Frew
(303) 735-1285
frew@colorado.edu
This apprenticeship will initially focus on testing and characterizing the performance of a time-of-flight camera. These instruments can be thought of as 3-dimensional cameras; instead of returning color information for each pixel, they return the distance from the camera to the object seen in that pixel. The work will take place in the Indoor Flying Robot Laboratory in the Fleming Building. After initial characterization is complete, the camera will be mounted on either a 3DR RTF X8 multi-rotor drone or an iRobot ground robot. Various test cases will be carried out to gather data for estimating information about the vehicle the camera is mounted on as well as its environment including other vehicles in the area. Depending on the progress made in the first semester, the student may also be involved in creating navigation and control algorithms that use the information obtained from the time-of-flight camera.


Preferred that the student has an estimation background or at least one controls course (e.g. ASEN 4114), although this is not strictly REQUIRED.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - QB50 Cubesat Embedded System Development Scott Palo
(303) 492-4289
palo@colorado.edu







The University of Colorado is one of 4 US Universities building cubesats for the QB50 project, an initiative to launch 50 cubesats from a single launch vehicle. The command and data handling system is a Microchip dsPIC33, 16bit microcontroller running a slot OS real-time task scheduler. The student working on this project will support the development of hardware drivers, a command interpreter and task modules for the CDH system. This will include the development of the modules along with testing and verification of their performance on qualification hardware.


https://www.qb50.eu/
Some embedded system and C-programming experience required. Knowledge of Microchip PIC 16-bit micro-controller desired.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Developing a Receiver for Lunar Spacecraft Navigation Jeff Parker
(303) 931-5334
parkerjs@colorado.edu







The goal of this apprenticeship is to gain experience working with satellite technology and to develop hardware for space flight. The apprentice will work with a radio receiver that will pick up navigation signals, process them onboard, and ultimately assist in navigating a spacecraft on a lunar mission. The immediate application will be for a small satellite, but if the hardware is fully validated it may very well fly aboard the Orion spacecraft, America's next manned spacecraft. The apprentice will work with hardware and software, testing both in a variety of environments. The apprentice will begin by testing two UHF receivers on the ground. We will program an FPGA board to convert UHF signals into navigation signals and process them on the flight hardware. Experience in FPGA programming will be very beneficial. After ground tests are complete, the UHF receiver will be flown in an aircraft and demonstrated in the air. Once complete, the system will then be flown in a high-altitude balloon - testing the system at 100,000+ feet. The ultimate goal is to perform enough tests to fly this system on the Orion spacecraft in 2017; the Orion team will be interested in our results.


Prior experience programming with C, especially on a microprocessor / FPGA will be particularly helpful. This apprenticeship will involve hardware and software testing in support of flight tests aboard an airplane and aboard a high-altitude balloon. Ultimately this system will be placed aboard spacecraft and will assist in their navigation, notably to the Moon.
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Graphical Interface for Numerical Analysis using the Janus Supercomputer Melinda Piket-May

Melinda.Piket-May@colorado.edu







The main objective of this research project is to completely model electrically large electromagnetic (EM) problems with minimal numerical dispersion and minimal computing time with a graphical user interface (GUI) interface for quick automated post processing of the EM phenomena being modeled. The second order time and space finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm is one standard method for solving such problems, but has a fundamental numerical dispersion handicap. The recently developed second order in time, fourth order in space finite volume (FV24) algorithm effectively cancels out FDTD’s numerical dispersion. The FV24 algorithm itself is currently implemented in the Fortran 90 programming language. Graphical processing units (GPUs) are used to execute the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) Fortran parallel implementation of the FV24 algorithm. Cutting-edge GPUs are evaluated for use with FV24 to reduce the algorithm’s execution time. This project will work with optimizing the code to run on multiple CPU's and GPU's. It will also work with developing a Graphical User Interface for the system.


A strong programming background. The student must have an interest in high performance computing. A knowledge of FORTRAN/FORTRAN90 and CUDA are helpful but not necessary.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CSGC - Radiometer or RF Engineer for a CubeSat payload to understand climate change Brian Sanders
(303) 492-5451
brian.sanders@colorado.edu







The student will work with a team of graduate and undergraduate students to build a system to better understand climate change. This CubeSat payload will provide greater atmospheric temperature resolution and will be able to map polar ice regions. The student will refine the MiniRad payload for a satellite system approaching design and testing phases by understanding remote sensing and a passive microwave radiometer. Or a student will work with the communications team to develop a software defined radio. Both the digital and analog systems will be tested and the design finalized.


http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/allstar-projects/polarcube
Fall 2014 Jr EE/ECE major standing or equivalent experience.
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - AES - Experiments in various Coulomb charging concepts Hanspeter Schaub
(303) 492-2767
hanspeter.schaub@colorado.edu

Lauren McManus
(404) 630-4804
lauren.mcmanus@colorado.edu



The AVS lab is engaged in advancing spacecraft technology via various Coulomb charging concepts. Several high voltage experiments are being conducted to validate numerical simulations of the electrostatic interactions. A 1-D rotational test bed has been built to study attitude control by Coulomb charging. Mylar films of various geometries are also charged to study membrane inflation and high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) debris dynamics. The DLA student will design and construct hardware components as necessary, and help to conduct the desired experiments.


http://hanspeterschaub.info/research-CoulombTestbed.html
Motivation. Machining experience, electrical/circuits experience, and software experience (MATLAB, Objective C, or Labview) are all desirable.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CEAE - Natural-Fiber Composites for Construction Wil Srubar

wsrubar@colorado.edu







This fundamental project will explore the design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization of natural-fiber composites for construction applications. The student will be responsible for manufacturing composite specimens using hot-press or wet-layup techniques and characterizing initial material properties (e.g., mechanical, physical, thermal). We will investigate the time-dependent aging of composites and predict their service-life using accelerated weathering methods. The project will focus primarily on gelatin- and poly-lactic acid-based, woven natural-fiber composites. However, depending on preliminary results and student interest, the course of study may also include 3D-printed biofoams for thermal insulation. The student can expect to learn the fundamentals of novel materials research, to work under the supervision of the PI, and collaborate with a team of graduate student mentors. The student will also learn to effectively communicate their research results via informal group meetings and public presentations.


http://spot.colorado.edu/~wisr7047
This project is intended for undergraduates in their junior or senior year who have taken fundamental courses in chemistry, calculus, statics, and mechanics of materials.
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Design and Development of an Arctic Observing Laser Radar System Jeff Thayer
(303) 492-1764
jeffrey.thayer@colorado.edu

Robert Stillwell
(719) 330-5819
robert.stillwell@colorado.edu



A new autonomous high powered laser radar system is being developed which will observe water vapor concentration and temperature in the arctic. This system will be deployed in the summer of 2015 to Summit Camp, Greenland. It will be assembled and tested in Boulder over the coming year. A DLA student will help with construction of the system including: CAD models, construction of daily operations and housekeeping software, automated processing software, assembly and testing.


http://ccar.colorado.edu/rstillwell/SuPR.html
Software experience desirable (SolidWorks, Labview, Matlab) Available to work on selected weekends and nights when testing is a plus
Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
EnEd - When you grow up...? Improving flexibility in engineering choices at CU Boulder Malinda Zarske
(303) 735-0987
Malinda.Zarske@Colorado.EDU







Do you have academic interests outside of engineering? Do you relate to your peers who are not sure what they want to do after they earn their degree? Do you want to help our College grow in flexible degree options for its students? Today’s college-aged students are less inclined to stick with one job after graduation; however, our nation’s need for citizens with science and engineering literacy in all professions has never been more critical. General Engineering is a new undergraduate degree program in the College of Engineering and Applied Science at CU Boulder, which provides a customizable design-based degree for students looking for an interdisciplinary engineering degree with additional work in another area of interest, such as teaching, business, pre-med, or arts and media. In this DLA apprenticeship, you will develop and investigate a research question based on recruiting and community formation in the newly emerging General Engineering degree program. You will gain experience in research methods and data trending (a skill useful for process development). And, you will help shape the future by making recommendations on how to improve the College’s engineering experience.


None
Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea

Projects for Applied Mathematics

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
AES - Satellite-based navigation (GPS/GNSS) for satellites Dennis Akos

dma@colorado.edu







Project involves development of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for space-based vehicles. Working with local industry, graduate students, and professor to develop next generation GPS receivers - as well as receivers capable of processing signals from similar systems (Russia's GLONASS, EU's Galileo, and China's Compass). Project involves all elements from antenna, through the radio components, the signal processing, the position solution and orbit determination elements. Students can get involved with any or all of the specific aspects of the project. Please contact Dennis Akos (dma@colorado.edu) to discuss further or if you just have any questions. Thanks!!


US citizen, solid programming skills (wiht Matlab, Python, and/or C), junior or senior standing

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - GPS/GNSS Receiver Design for Space Applications Dennis Akos

dma@colorado.edu







Project involves development of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for space-based vehicles. Working with local industry, graduate students, and professor to develop next generation GPS receivers - as well as receivers capable of processing signals from similar systems (Russia's GLONASS, EU's Galileo, and China's Compass). Project involves all elements from antenna, through the radio components, the signal processing, the position solution and orbit determination elements. Students can get involved with any or all of the specific aspects of the project. Would welcome participation summer 2014 if available/interested! Please contact Dennis Akos (dma@colorado.edu) to discuss further or if you just have any questions. Thanks!!


US citizen, solid programming skills (with Matlab, Python, and/or C), junior or senior standing

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Cubesat Orbit Analysis–Use TLEs to characterize orbit evolution and conjunctions Penina Axelrad
(303) 492-8183
penina.axelrad@colorado.edu







New cubesat and nanosat programs are underway internationally involving university students and professionals. These efforts are sure to increase because of the low cost of entry, increasing number of standardized components and launch opportunities for cubesats as secondary payloads. In the U.S. interest in cubesats by universities, NASA, NSF, and the DoD is growing because of their potential to provide a much lower cost means for making valuable measurements for scientific, commercial, and national security applications. With the proliferation of cubesats, it is critical to understand their orbital characteristics, how long they will remain on-orbit, and any threats they may present in creating space debris and the potential for collisions with other existing satellites. The project is to gather a history of existing cubesat launches and evaluate using publicly available two-line-element data, their past and expected orbital evolution and perform a conjunction analysis using online and STK capabilities to better understand collision likelihoods. These results will provide important insights that will aid future research on ground-based satellite tracking


http://www.celestrak.com/SOCRATES/
Students must have working knowledge of MATLAB and STK for use in analyzing orbits at the level of ASEN3200. Current juniors in Aerospace Engineering Sciences, or students at other levels or from other departments who have gained this knowledge through individual study or work experience are eligible.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Feature identification in 3D Time-of-Flight Camera images for navigation Penina Axelrad
(303) 492-8183
penina.axelrad@colorado.edu





Jay McMahon

The DLA student will work with faculty and a graduate student who are developing estimation strategies for spacecraft autonomous rendezvous, approach, and docking (AR&D). The current simulation assumes that observed features of the target can be matched perfectly with known features identified in satellite drawings. To make the simulation more realistic and to incorporate actual measurements, we are looking for a student to develop the tools to automatically extract features that are most beneficial for AR&D, and work with experimental data from a 3D IR Camera that provides ranging measurements for each pixel in the image.


Students must have expertise in image processing toolbox in MATLAB or Python, basic knowledge of Solidworks or other CAD tool, and general programming skills in one of these languages.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
EnEd - Engineering Student and Alumni Perspectives on Social Responsibility Angela Bielefeldt
(303) 492-8433
angela.bielefeldt@colorado.edu

Greg Rulifson

Gregory.Rulifson@colorado.edu



A continuing study funded by the NSF to understand how engineers view social responsibility, from students through the workforce. The research combines quantitative survey data with qualitative information from open-ended survey questions and interviews. The study is expanding from 5 schools and 3 engineering majors to ~30 schools and all engineering majors.


None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Automating Network Updates Pavol Cerny

pavol.cerny@colorado.edu







Configuration updates are a leading cause of instability in networks. A key factor that makes updates difficult to implement is that networks are distributed systems with hundreds or thousands of nodes all interacting with each other. Even if the initial and final configurations are correct, naively updating individual nodes can easily cause the network to exhibit incorrect behaviors such as forwarding loops, black holes, and security vulnerabilities. The goal of this project is to develop a new approach to the network update problem: automatically generate updates that are guaranteed to be correct. Knowledge of networking would be a plus, but it is not required. More information in http://ecee.colorado.edu/pavol/publications/synt13/synt13.pdf


http://ecee.colorado.edu/pavol/publications/synt13/synt13.pdf
Programming experience, discrete mathematics course such as ECEN 2703 or CSCI 2824.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CS - Validating Android Apps Bor-Yuh Chang

bec@cs.colorado.edu







The Android framework is complex, making it extremely difficult to difficult to develop apps that work as intended. For example, it is quite easy to write an app that unexpected crashes your phone by misusing the framework. The goal of this project is to develop tools and algorithms that find and fix defects in Android apps.


http://pl.cs.colorado.edu/projects/thresher/
Looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated student with strong programming skills. Experience with building compiler-like tools is beneficial. The student will have the opportunity to learn about the design of program analysis tools.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Studying User Interfaces and Visualizations for Reasoning Assistants Bor-Yuh Chang

bec@cs.colorado.edu







Developing programs that work as intended is hard, right? One reason is that the developer has to mentally simulate what the program will do when executed. Wouldn’t it be great if we had development tools that did this simulation for you and could show you what might go wrong even before you have executable code?!? This project will explore building a front-end for a program analyzer that infers properties about dynamic data structures. The goal of this project is to present analysis results during development time in a manner useful to the programmer and to study the effectiveness of doing so. To the program developer, the completed system might look like an online and symbolic debugger that could highlight potential errors in program fragments.


Looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated student with strong programming skills. Experience with building user interfaces and/or compiler-like tools is beneficial but not required. The student will have the opportunity to learn about the design of program analysis tools.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Taming Dynamic Languages Bor-Yuh Chang

bec@cs.colorado.edu







Love JavaScript? Hate that there are few development tools for it? Dynamic languages like JavaScript are extremely flexible leading to a proliferation of very powerful frameworks. At the same, this flexibility is what makes tools for these languages so difficult to build and so poor in general. The goal of this project is to codify the idioms that framework developers use in the form of types or other kinds of specifications and design tools and checkers that support these idiomatic uses of dynamic languages.


http://pl.cs.colorado.edu/projects/fissile/
Looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated student with strong programming skills. Experience with compiler-like tools is beneficial. The student will have the opportunity to learn about the design of program analysis tools.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Smart Materials/Electronic Textiles for Wearable Technology and Novel Interfaces Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
ncorrell@colorado.edu

Halley Profita

halley.profita@colorado.edu


(303) 717-1436
Student will help in the development of novel textile forms of wearable technology using microcontrollers and networked hardware. New form factors, gesture interfaces, and smart material construction will be explored. We would like to develop smart materials and interaction techniques (wearable technology) for multiple applications including military, art, assistive technology, music, etc.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
Would like: Programming or electronics skills Would like: Machining, CAD, building/shop, or fabrication skills

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Distributed Algorithms for Reconfigurable Self-Organizing Smart Wall Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu

Nicholas Farrow

nicholas.farrow@colorado.edu



The focus of this apprenticeship is to investigate controlling large scale swarm robotic structures by programming swarm algorithms at the individual node level. The student will be working with the lab's Amorphous Facade project which uses reconfigurable hexagonal blocks for the swarm nodes. The student will investigate various algorithms and methods of routing data and control signals between nodes, creating distributed user interfaces, as well programming the nodes to predict user behaviors. There will be many opportunities for the student to choose their own research path with this project, as well as to develop new block types for integration with the current library of blocks.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=574
Some experience with basic electronics and microcontroller programming will be helpful, but are not required. Experience with C/C++ programming is required.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CS - Biologically Realistic Visualization of the Transcriptional Regulation Process Robin Dowell
(303) 492-8204
robin.dowell@colorado.edu

David Knox

david.knox@Colorado.EDU



The Dowell Lab has a summer project to create animations of a biological process for entry into the National Science Foundation’s international contest for visualization. This project is looking for undergraduate participation in the design and creation of animations that depict individual molecules interacting with DNA. Our final results will be entered into the National Science Foundation’s “International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge” held every September. The ongoing goal for this project is the creation of an educational tool for teaching the dynamics and stochastic nature of transcriptional regulation. This summer’s project is to explore possible animation techniques, which plays a major role in making the tool both engaging and educational. Future projects will build on the animation methods to build a prototype teaching tool that will be integrated in biology classes here at CU.


http://dowell.colorado.edu/project-modeling.html
We are looking for students with computer programming experience. Applicants must have successfully completed course work through Data Structures (CSCI 2270) and be able to independently create computer applications. Knowledge of Computer Systems (CSCI 2400), Algorithms (CSCI 3104), and biology are also preferred. Experience in education or educational computer games is also a plus. This project is a group effort requiring excellent communication skills.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Solar Forecasting Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu





Kim Newman
(303) 735-2287
Kimberly.Newman@colorado.edu
To optimally manage power grids energized by either dense or distributed photovoltaic (PV) sources at high levels of grid integration it is necessary to predict the direct and diffuse solar flux in near real time from a few minutes to several hours ahead and at high spatial resolutions of up to ~0.5 km. This project addresses these needs through the development and field demonstration of an optimized cloud and solar intensity (“insolation”) forecasting system based on both distributed ground-based sensors using smart phones and in situ PV power monitoring of solar array output. The system will provide real-time prediction of insolation on time and space scales relevant for operational power grid management. The system is being built and demonstrated in Boulder using deployable sensors developed under two CU capstone projects and funded by the CU Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute. Interest in field experimentation, sensor development, and weather forecasting, clouds, and renewable energy is important.


Interest in weather, use of smart phones, and renewable energy

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Remote Sensing from Unmanned Aircraft for Agriculture Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu

Eryan Dai
(303) 459-4266
eryan.dai@gmail.com

Maciej Stachura
(720) 335-7558
maciej.stachura@blackswifttech.com
CU and Black Swift Technologies are embarking upon a Phase II project involving development, testing, and field validation of a small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) with a highly capable passive microwave radiometer to provide soil moisture measurements over an area of up to ~400 acres per flight. Tight integration of the sensor with the sUAS avionics and airframe will enable precise flight control for low altitude missions in the range of 15m-30m above ground level (AGL) required for the sensor to accurately map soil moisture down to ~5cm in depth at up to a 15m resolution for agricultural purposes. Phase II involves building a modified removable nose cone for the UAS to house the sensor payload and converts the propulsion to a twin prop design on the wings. Phase II also includes the design of several new technologies, including a lightweight and low cost sensor board to measure both the infrared temperature of the ground and the Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI) and high speed mass memory based on SD RAM cards. The project will involve supporting the development and testing of these sensors and memory along with general help in integrating them into the UAS.


http://cet.colorado.edu
Interest in unmanned aircraft and environmental remote sensing. ECEN 3400 and 3410 are desirable.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Terahertz Radio Wave Propagation Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu

Larry Scally

Larry.Scally@coloradoengineeringinc.com



The focus of this project is a study of how electromagnetic waves in the frequency range from ~100 to 1000 GHz ("terahertz radio waves") propagate through the atmosphere. Specifically, we are interested in the impact of atmospheric turbulence and the associated fluctuations in the index of refraction in the air caused by this turbulence on the coherency of waves propagating across distances of kilometers. To study these effects CU has developed the Terahertz Atmospheric Ionospheric Propagation, Absorption, and Scattering" (TAIPAS) experiment. This experiment consists of a 325-340 GHz transmitter from the ECEE building to receivers at the Green Mesa site, and includes weather instrumentation, an optical scintillometer, and a radio telecommunications link. This project solicits help in running the TAIPAS system and in collecting and analyzing the data from the TAIPAS transmissometer, telescopes, and weather sensors. An interest in radio waves and experience in using Linux and Windows computers is important for this work.


http://cet.colorado.edu
ECEN 3400 and ECEN 3410 are important for this work.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Effects of transients in multimode erbium-doped fiber communication systems Juliet Gopinath