Complete Listing of Discovery Learning Apprenticeships by Faculty Affiliation with a Department or Program

Please note that this list is sorted by the department or program of the faculty member offering the apprenticeship. Students from other majors may still be able to apply for projects. If there are no apprenticeships listed, please check back soon for updates, as listings change frequently.

 

PLEASE NOTE: We are aware that many of the links in apprenticeship descriptions are broken if you click on them directly. Please copy and paste links into your web browser if you have problems viewing them.


To view projects listed by major, select "Apprenticeships by Major" at left.

 

Projects offered by Applied Mathematics


Projects offered by Aerospace Engineering Sciences

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
AES - Satellite-based navigation (GPS/GNSS) for satellites Dennis Akos

dma@colorado.edu







Project involves development of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for space-based vehicles. Working with local industry, graduate students, and professor to develop next generation GPS receivers - as well as receivers capable of processing signals from similar systems (Russia's GLONASS, EU's Galileo, and China's Compass). Project involves all elements from antenna, through the radio components, the signal processing, the position solution and orbit determination elements. Students can get involved with any or all of the specific aspects of the project. Please contact Dennis Akos (dma@colorado.edu) to discuss further or if you just have any questions. Thanks!!


US citizen, solid programming skills (wiht Matlab, Python, and/or C), junior or senior standing

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - GPS/GNSS Receiver Design for Space Applications Dennis Akos

dma@colorado.edu







Project involves development of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for space-based vehicles. Working with local industry, graduate students, and professor to develop next generation GPS receivers - as well as receivers capable of processing signals from similar systems (Russia's GLONASS, EU's Galileo, and China's Compass). Project involves all elements from antenna, through the radio components, the signal processing, the position solution and orbit determination elements. Students can get involved with any or all of the specific aspects of the project. Would welcome participation summer 2014 if available/interested! Please contact Dennis Akos (dma@colorado.edu) to discuss further or if you just have any questions. Thanks!!


US citizen, solid programming skills (with Matlab, Python, and/or C), junior or senior standing

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Cubesat Orbit Analysis–Use TLEs to characterize orbit evolution and conjunctions Penina Axelrad
(303) 492-8183
penina.axelrad@colorado.edu







New cubesat and nanosat programs are underway internationally involving university students and professionals. These efforts are sure to increase because of the low cost of entry, increasing number of standardized components and launch opportunities for cubesats as secondary payloads. In the U.S. interest in cubesats by universities, NASA, NSF, and the DoD is growing because of their potential to provide a much lower cost means for making valuable measurements for scientific, commercial, and national security applications. With the proliferation of cubesats, it is critical to understand their orbital characteristics, how long they will remain on-orbit, and any threats they may present in creating space debris and the potential for collisions with other existing satellites. The project is to gather a history of existing cubesat launches and evaluate using publicly available two-line-element data, their past and expected orbital evolution and perform a conjunction analysis using online and STK capabilities to better understand collision likelihoods. These results will provide important insights that will aid future research on ground-based satellite tracking


http://www.celestrak.com/SOCRATES/
Students must have working knowledge of MATLAB and STK for use in analyzing orbits at the level of ASEN3200. Current juniors in Aerospace Engineering Sciences, or students at other levels or from other departments who have gained this knowledge through individual study or work experience are eligible.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Feature identification in 3D Time-of-Flight Camera images for navigation Penina Axelrad
(303) 492-8183
penina.axelrad@colorado.edu





Jay McMahon

The DLA student will work with faculty and a graduate student who are developing estimation strategies for spacecraft autonomous rendezvous, approach, and docking (AR&D). The current simulation assumes that observed features of the target can be matched perfectly with known features identified in satellite drawings. To make the simulation more realistic and to incorporate actual measurements, we are looking for a student to develop the tools to automatically extract features that are most beneficial for AR&D, and work with experimental data from a 3D IR Camera that provides ranging measurements for each pixel in the image.


Students must have expertise in image processing toolbox in MATLAB or Python, basic knowledge of Solidworks or other CAD tool, and general programming skills in one of these languages.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
AES - Space Weather: Origins of satellite disturbances in the auroral zone Delores Knipp
(303) 492-2393
delores.knipp@colorado.edu

Robert Redmon
(303) 497-4331
Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov



Earth’s high latitudes are the location of otherworldly auroral displays and intense electrical currents. Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) spacecraft have revealed new relationships between the solar emissions and the response of the upper atmosphere. This project aims to unite three data sets from LEO spacecraft that relate particles and field variations in Earth’s upper atmosphere to energy supplied by the solar wind. During the 2013-2014 Academic Year a DLA researcher successfully merged LEO spacecraft data from a database at the University of Texas at Dallas space-data portal and similar, but more coarsely-processed, data at the National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder to create an extended, quality-flagged database for electric fields measurements at the atmosphere-space interface. The new effort will involve 1) additional data processing and quality-checking and 2) the marriage of the electric field, magnetic field and particle data to produce an energy deposition estimate along the track of the LEO satellites. Our intent is to make these data available for worldwide use in a NASA supported virtual observatory. Once the database is created, we will study features that may enhance satellite drag or create other spacecraft perturbations in the context of past and novel space weather activity parameters.


Availability to work in 2 5-hr blocks would be useful. Some work will be conducted at NOAA's David Skaggs Research Center at 825 Broadway in Boulder. Must be US citizen or green card holder Must pass background check for access to NOAA facility Should have an interest in space-related physical science Should be familiar with general logic for database searches. MATLAB or IDL experience would be helpful

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Climate Monitoring Using Reconstructed Sea Level and Satellite Altimetry Robert Leben
(303) 492-4113
leben@colorado.edu







Student will help develop a website hosting climate indices derived from reconstructed sea level and optimally interpolated altimetry datasets from 1850 to present. Climate indices will be developed to represent ocean climate signals such as El Nino and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, as well as indices for monitoring variability in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The student will help to generate these indices and make them publicly available on a dedicated website. These indices will be used to monitor major patterns of climate variability with significant societal impacts, and will provide talking points for outreach to the general public about climate variability and climate change.


http://eddy.colorado.edu/ccar/data_viewer/index
None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
AES - Autonomous Systems Development for Unmanned Aircraft James Mack
(303) 704-5464
James.Mack@Colorado.EDU





Eric Frew
(303) 735-1285
Eric.Frew@colorado.edu
The Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) is seeking an undergraduate student to assist with the development of autonomous systems for unmanned aircraft. The student will work with an existing team of faculty and graduate students to further RECUV’s current unmanned aircraft systems. Our area of research is combining sensing with autonomous decision-making in unmanned aircraft. The student would be expected to fill one or more of the following roles: Embedded Systems: * Specification and assembly of embedded systems and sensors * Programming and setup of systems to acquire and communicate sensor data * Setup communications systems to between devices Unmanned Aircraft: * Construction of unmanned aircraft and setup of unmanned aircraft avionics * Integration of sensors into unmanned aircraft Software and Computer Systems: * Develop software to support hardware user interfaces. * Develop software for autonomous navigation * Develop software to manage operational data and activities All students will be expected to support their particular subsystems during field operations in and around Boulder County.


http://recuv.colorado.edu/research.html
Students should have at least one 3-hour block free per week to support field operations. The following skills are particularly beneficial to this position. Experience in multiple disciplines is preferred. Unmanned Aircraft: * Aviation and aerodynamics, including full sized aviation * Unmanned aircraft, including R/C planes * Flight controllers (autopilots, gyros) Electronics: * Sensors and data acquisition * Computer systems architecture * Embedded systems (microcontrollers, arduino, raspberry pi, etc.) * Wireless communication Fabrication/mechanical: * Ability to machine or specify machined parts * Composites design and construction * Woodworking tools and methods * Mechanical components and standard hardware Software: * Linux (use and programming) * C/C++ * Scripting languages (Python, shell scripts, etc.) * Data translation * Computer systems architecture * Networking and communications protocols

Very little supervision; student will need to work largely independently
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Range Sensor Testing and Usage for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation Jay McMahon
(303) 492-3944
jay.mcmahon@colorado.edu





Eric Frew
(303) 735-1285
frew@colorado.edu
This apprenticeship will initially focus on testing and characterizing the performance of a time-of-flight camera. These instruments can be thought of as 3-dimensional cameras; instead of returning color information for each pixel, they return the distance from the camera to the object seen in that pixel. The work will take place in the Indoor Flying Robot Laboratory in the Fleming Building. After initial characterization is complete, the camera will be mounted on either a 3DR RTF X8 multi-rotor drone or an iRobot ground robot. Various test cases will be carried out to gather data for estimating information about the vehicle the camera is mounted on as well as its environment including other vehicles in the area. Depending on the progress made in the first semester, the student may also be involved in creating navigation and control algorithms that use the information obtained from the time-of-flight camera.


Preferred that the student has an estimation background or at least one controls course (e.g. ASEN 4114), although this is not strictly REQUIRED.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - QB50 Cubesat Embedded System Development Scott Palo
(303) 492-4289
palo@colorado.edu







The University of Colorado is one of 4 US Universities building cubesats for the QB50 project, an initiative to launch 50 cubesats from a single launch vehicle. The command and data handling system is a Microchip dsPIC33, 16bit microcontroller running a slot OS real-time task scheduler. The student working on this project will support the development of hardware drivers, a command interpreter and task modules for the CDH system. This will include the development of the modules along with testing and verification of their performance on qualification hardware.


https://www.qb50.eu/
Some embedded system and C-programming experience required. Knowledge of Microchip PIC 16-bit micro-controller desired.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - Developing a Receiver for Lunar Spacecraft Navigation Jeff Parker
(303) 931-5334
parkerjs@colorado.edu







The goal of this apprenticeship is to gain experience working with satellite technology and to develop hardware for space flight. The apprentice will work with a radio receiver that will pick up navigation signals, process them onboard, and ultimately assist in navigating a spacecraft on a lunar mission. The immediate application will be for a small satellite, but if the hardware is fully validated it may very well fly aboard the Orion spacecraft, America's next manned spacecraft. The apprentice will work with hardware and software, testing both in a variety of environments. The apprentice will begin by testing two UHF receivers on the ground. We will program an FPGA board to convert UHF signals into navigation signals and process them on the flight hardware. Experience in FPGA programming will be very beneficial. After ground tests are complete, the UHF receiver will be flown in an aircraft and demonstrated in the air. Once complete, the system will then be flown in a high-altitude balloon - testing the system at 100,000+ feet. The ultimate goal is to perform enough tests to fly this system on the Orion spacecraft in 2017; the Orion team will be interested in our results.


Prior experience programming with C, especially on a microprocessor / FPGA will be particularly helpful. This apprenticeship will involve hardware and software testing in support of flight tests aboard an airplane and aboard a high-altitude balloon. Ultimately this system will be placed aboard spacecraft and will assist in their navigation, notably to the Moon.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
AES - AES - Experiments in various Coulomb charging concepts Hanspeter Schaub
(303) 492-2767
hanspeter.schaub@colorado.edu

Lauren McManus
(404) 630-4804
lauren.mcmanus@colorado.edu



The AVS lab is engaged in advancing spacecraft technology via various Coulomb charging concepts. Several high voltage experiments are being conducted to validate numerical simulations of the electrostatic interactions. A 1-D rotational test bed has been built to study attitude control by Coulomb charging. Mylar films of various geometries are also charged to study membrane inflation and high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) debris dynamics. The DLA student will design and construct hardware components as necessary, and help to conduct the desired experiments.


http://hanspeterschaub.info/research-CoulombTestbed.html
Motivation. Machining experience, electrical/circuits experience, and software experience (MATLAB, Objective C, or Labview) are all desirable.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
AES - Parallel Processing for Quasi-Complex Gradients Ryan Starkey
(303) 492-0871
rstarkey@colorado.edu

Ben Dunham

Benjamin.Dunham@colorado.edu



Quasi-Complex Gradients (QCG) is a method of calculating infinite machine precision computational derivatives in a single function call (up to 8th-order tested). It has application in any computer model requiring derivative information (design optimization, sensitivity analysis, adjoints, etc.). QCG has been shown to be from 2-10 times faster than finite differences. It is an operator overloaded extension to complex math using an infinite number of orthogonal imaginary axes. QCG has been developed in C++ and utilizes automatic code generation to write compiler ready code based on the order of derivatives required (to eliminate redundancies and write the overloaded operators). The DLA will assist the team in one of more of the following tasks (in order of priority): 1) investigate software acceleration methods using parallel processing (including GPUs), 2) develop a Python API to automatically transform a given code to a QCG code, and 3) investigate APIs required to run the C++ QCG code in other languages such as Fortran (if possible). This project may lead to the commercialization of QCG and/or an open source version. A provisional patent application has been submitted for QCG.


http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2012-5487
Experience in parallel processing using OpenMPI (including GPUs) a plus.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
AES - Design and Development of an Arctic Observing Laser Radar System Jeff Thayer
(303) 492-1764
jeffrey.thayer@colorado.edu

Robert Stillwell
(719) 330-5819
robert.stillwell@colorado.edu



A new autonomous high powered laser radar system is being developed which will observe water vapor concentration and temperature in the arctic. This system will be deployed in the summer of 2015 to Summit Camp, Greenland. It will be assembled and tested in Boulder over the coming year. A DLA student will help with construction of the system including: CAD models, construction of daily operations and housekeeping software, automated processing software, assembly and testing.


http://ccar.colorado.edu/rstillwell/SuPR.html
Software experience desirable (SolidWorks, Labview, Matlab) Available to work on selected weekends and nights when testing is a plus

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others

Projects offered by Chemical and Biological Engineering

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
CHBE - Engineering dynamic 3D matrices to study valvular interstitial cell phenotype Kristi Anseth

kristi.anseth@colorado.edu

Kelly Mabry

kelly.m.mabry@colorado.edu



Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) are the primary cell type within the aortic valve and are active regulators in the progression of valve disease. Extended activation of the VICs to a myofibroblast phenotype can lead to valve fibrosis and calcification. Environmental stiffness is a critical determinant of myofibroblast activation. While there has been much progress in understanding how VICs respond to mechanical and biochemical cues in two-dimensional cell culture systems, less is known about how stiffness influences VIC phenotypes in three-dimensional environments. This project aims to use dynamic 3D matrices to understand how VICs respond to stiffness in 3D. Additionally, we aim to study disease progression and potential regression by developing a materials platform that will allow us to increase and decrease the modulus of the cellular microenvironment.


http://www.colorado.edu/ansethgroup/people/kelly-mabry
None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CHBE - A Novel Chemistry for Kinetically-Controlled Degradable Hydrogel Networks Christopher Bowman
(303) 492-3247
christopher.bowman@colorado.edu

Gayla Berg
(303) 492-2997
gayla.berg@colorado.edu



Degradable hydrogels have been extremely important in the development of biomaterials in recent years. A hydrogel is a crosslinked network polymer with hydrophilic chains that allow for a high degree of water intake. Slow degradation of hydrogels over time has proven to be a crucial factor in 3D cell and tissue culture, sustained drug release, and wound dressing applications. This project seeks to establish a new type of chemistry for hydrogel degradation, which is pH-independent and highly tunable. In addition, one of the major goals of the project is to spatially and temporally control gel synthesis – and possibly alter the degradation process itself – using photochemistry and light exposure. The student will be working from a materials perspective in forming the gels, characterizing reaction kinetics and rheological properties, and assessing photochemical behavior via spectroscopy.


http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n12/full/ncomms2271.html
I am looking for someone who will *not* be graduating in May 2015 and who would be open to continuing research beyond the DLA program year. A multi-year effort benefits both the project and the student greatly, and increases the chance that the student’s work will be included in a publication.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CHBE - Design of Polymer Materials Capable of Signaling Their Own Mechanical Failure Andrew Goodwin
(303) 492-3573
andrew.goodwin@colorado.edu






(303) 492-3573
In the Goodwin Research Group, we explore the effect of chemical properties on the physical properties of colloids (droplets, bubbles, and particles) and polymer materials. For example, is it possible to design polymer materials that tell their user when they are wearing out, or even undergo automatic self-healing procedures? To design such materials, we are studying the effect of mechanical stimulation (e.g. stretching, twisting, cutting) on the chemical structures within the material. The student who works on this project will team with a graduate student or postdoctoral researcher to design polymer materials with pre-programmed mechanical properties on large and small scales. In doing so, the student will gain hands-on experience with chemical and materials synthesis and microscopy for characterization, and successful research results will be incorporated into journal publications.


http://www.colorado.edu/chbe/andrew-p-goodwin
Must have completed at least one semester of Organic Chemistry lecture and lab.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CHBE - "Smart" Droplets That Can Sense Biomolecules as Hallmarks of Disease Andrew Goodwin
(303) 492-3573
andrew.goodwin@colorado.edu







In the Goodwin Research Group, we are interested in creating “stimulus-responsive” structures, in which the presence of a specific molecule or application of an external energy force changes the properties of the structure. This may result in, for example, the release of drug molecules at a diseased site or the creation of a detectable signal that will “paint” an area of interest in the body. One research area that we are pursuing is the manipulation of chemical structures on the interface between a colloid (e.g. droplet, bubble, or particle) and the surrounding medium. Using this technology as a starting point, we are currently designing new tools to detect small amounts of biomolecules as hallmarks of disease more quickly, cheaply, and portably than what is currently available. The student who works on this project will gain hands-on experience in creating “smart” droplets and detecting biomolecules in complex media.


http://www.colorado.edu/chbe/andrew-p-goodwin
Must have completed Organic Chemistry lecture and lab.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CHBE - Studies of reaction in the interphase in polymer nanocomposites Jeffrey Stansbury
(303) 724-1044
jeffrey.stansbury@ucdenver.edu

Parag Shah

parag.shah@gmail.com



Multicomponent polymer-based nanocomposite materials are now an everyday occurrence. A tremendous amount of work has been done to improve properties of nanocomposites; however, little is known regarding the actual covalent interconnection of the filler to the polymer matrix. The influence of the interphase can extend to significant length scales beyond the filler surface. The current project aims to determine the reaction extent and kinetics involving the interphase of nanocomposites of silica nanoparticles and a polymer matrix. Surface silanes will be varied from monolayers to dense multilayers to study how initial structure and extent of copolymerization with the polymer matrix control properties. Real-time near-IR spectroscopy will be used to monitor conversion of the functional groups as polymerization proceeds. The silane will be chosen such that its vinyl group in the near-infrared spectrum is distinct from that of the resin-phase in order to distinguish matrix and interfacial conversion. We will couple conversion measurements to material property development during and following polymerization to understand how interface formation dynamics affect nanocomposite properties.


http://www.colorado.edu/chbe/jeffrey-w-stansbury
This project will require a minimum of 2 hour blocks of time

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CHBE - Studies for the Synthesis of Mg Metal using a Hybrid Solar/Electric Reactor Alan Weimer
(303) 492-3759
alan.weimer@colorado.edu

Illias Hischier

illias.hischier@colorado.edu



The proposed process uses a high temperature chemical reactor that is hybrid-heated using both concentrated sunlight during the daytime and electricity at night to produce magnesium metal (Mg) that is useful for lightweight alloys. Waste heat from the process will be used to split water in order to produce hydrogen gas that is combined with by-product carbon monoxide so that a synthesis gas is made and can be converted to gasoline or diesel fuels through separate chemical processing. The process uses raw materials that are produced in the United States and it is envisioned that the product Mg will be used for the production of lighter weight cars and trucks resulting in higher mileage vehicles. The production process will use less electricity and will release fewer greenhouse gases than current processes, and at a lower cost.


http://www.colorado.edu/che/TeamWeimer/
Student should be willing and interested in working during the summer of 2015 full time (40 hr/wk) in order to make a substantial contribution to the project. The student needs to commit to the summer 2015 work at CU in the lab. Hence, student should be a Jr or sophomore, not a senior. It is preferable that the student is a chemical or mechanical engineering major. This is an experimental related project.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea

Projects offered by Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
CEAE - An On-line Planning Tool for Climate Change Resiliency Development Support Paul Chinowsky
(303) 735-1063
paul.chinowsky@colorado.edu

Amy Schweikert

amy.schweikert@colorado.edu



Student will use Excel spreadsheets to create country-specific data to support World Bank funded project on climate impacts to infrastructure.


None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - An On-line Planning Tool for Climate Change Resiliency Development Support Paul Chinowsky
(303) 735-1063
paul.chinowsky@colorado.edu

Amy Schweikert

amy.schweikert@colorado.edu



Student will use Excel spreadsheets to create country-specific data to support World Bank funded project on climate impacts to infrastructure.


None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - Managing worker fatigue on remote high voltage power line projects Matthew Hallowell
(303) 704-8523
matthew.hallowell@colorado.edu






(303) 704-8523
Electrical power line installers have a fatality rate of 56.5 deaths per 100,000 employees each year, higher than any other occupation. This research directly addresses this issue with the first comprehensive research of worker fatigue in the electrical industry and the production of unique field-tested tools for fatigue management. The objectives of this apprenticeship are to: (1) review relevant scientific literature to better understand the triggers and physiological impacts of fatigue; (2) identify the specific aspects of high-voltage line work that contribute to fatigue; (3) devise effective fatigue management strategies specific to the industry; and (4) summarize the research findings in user-friendly, field-tested products.


www.safetylaboratory.org
Interest in speaking with workers who construct high voltage power lines in remote regions. These workers are the most likely to be killed on the job of any industry in the US.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily theoretical, most work on paper/electronic medium
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
CEAE - Forecasting construction injuries using predictive analytics Matthew Hallowell
(303) 704-8523
matthew.hallowell@colorado.edu






(303) 704-8523
This apprenticeship will focus on using past injury reports to forecast the probability of future injuries in new construction environments. The study will involve using data from past injuries to assess future risk. The methods we will use are similar to those used to predict weather. We will also explore how to integrate data into virtual design and construction computer models. This project will involve working in a team of at least 3 researchers. The official hypothesis and project description are as follows. The research objective of this project is to test the hypothesis that over half of the variability in construction injury statistics can be explained by a few inherent and basic attributes of construction environments. Predictor attributes will be identified by studying measurable patterns in US construction injury reports and the resulting dataset will be reduced to principal attributes using multivariate statistics. Principal attributes will be related to the probability of injury occurrence in mathematical models and the underlying hypothesis will be validated by comparing the predictions of these models with actual project outcomes.


www.safetylaboratory.org
Probability and Statistics course preferred.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
CEAE - IES Education Research Apprenticeship 2 C. IV
(303) 492-7603
walter.beamer@colorado.edu





Sandra Vasconez

The lighting program has been awarded an IES Education Grant to develop additional lighting courses and revise its current courses. With that in mind, the successful applicant will be involved in the development of basic lighting demonstrations and visualizations, researching web based delivery methods for course content, development of new course content, design and construction of lighting measurement equipment. Please direct any questions about this opportunity to Dr. Beamer at walter.beamer@colorado.edu.


Must have successfully completed AREN 3540: Illumination 1, AREN 4550: Illumination 2

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - IES Education Research Apprenticeship 1 C. IV
(303) 492-7603
walter.beamer@colorado.edu





Sandra Vasconez

The lighting program has been awarded an IES Education Grant to develop additional lighting courses and revise its current courses. With that in mind, the successful applicant will be involved in the development of basic lighting demonstrations and visualizations, researching web based delivery methods for course content, development of new course content, design and construction of lighting measurement equipment. Please direct any questions about this opportunity to Dr. Beamer at walter.beamer@colorado.edu.


Must have successfully completed AREN 3540: Illumination 1, AREN 4550: Illumination 2

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - Experimental Study: Effect of Liquefaction on Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Abbie Liel
(303) 492-1050
abbie.liel@colorado.edu





Shideh Dashti

shideh.dashti@colorado.edu
In this project, the student will work closely with a graduate student to implement an experimental study of the effects of liquefaction on building structures. The tests will use the centrifuge testing facility and require soil preparation, preparation of the structural specimen, and instrumentation. The focus is on measuring severity of liquefaction in soils, and the impact of this damage on the tilt and damage in the building structure.


civil.colorado.edu/~liel
Student must be available to work in the lab between 9 and 5 at least a couple of days per week for a minimum 1-2 hours.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - EVEN - Sol-Char Toilet Development Karl Linden
(303) 492-4798
karl.linden@colorado.edu

Cori Oversby

cori.oversby@gmail.com

Scott Summers

The Sol-Char Toilet research project is seeking a student assistant. This project is within the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundations Reinventing the Toilet Challenge. The student will have a chance to be a part of an international initiative to move sanitation technology forward and will work on a toilet prototype that uses solar energy to turn human fecal waste into valuable products. The student will work closely with the project staff researchers and Professors Linden and Summers. Analysis may include (1) evaluation of off gasses from the solar-thermal waste processing; (2) testing of the individual components of the toilet; (3) work on integrating the components of the toilet into an operational prototype; (4) studying biochar product properties; (5) investigating urine disinfection and resource recovery; (6) modeling of various components of the process


http://www.facebook.com/SolarBiochar
Strong interest in sanitation. Able and willing to work with human wastes

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CEAE - Evaluating the emissions from fuels used by developing communities Lupita Montoya
(303) 492-7137
lupita.montoya@colorado.edu

Wyatt Champion

wyattchampion@gmail.com



Research efforts will focus on both the emissions from the combustion of specific solid fuels, as well as the cultural acceptance and economic limitations of alternative forms of heating for poor communities, including the Navajo Nation. As part of this work, several solid fuels including pine, cedar, biorchars and various types of coal will be evaluated by combusting them individually in a cookstove and measuring the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulate matter (PM) using a Portable Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) and integrated sampling. A published Water Boiling Test (WBT) will be used in this project.


At least junior standing, have completed Thermodynamics, should be able to work at least 8 hours per week in blocks of at least 3 hours.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - Indoor air quality characterization and control for developing communities Lupita Montya
(303) 492-7137
lupita.montoya@colorado.edu







This apprenticeship will support the efforts of two main lines of research in the Montoya Laboratory. One project focuses on the evaluation of indoor air quality problems due to formaldehyde emissions at various locales. The second project focuses on the development of control methods for formaldehyde and other VOCs, specially those that can be affordable for deployment in developing communities.


Student should have at least sophomore level standing and preferably majoring in Environmental Engineering.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - Investigation of the fluorescence properties of organic matter Fernando Rosario-Ortiz
(303) 492-7608
fernando.rosario@colorado.edu







This project will evaluate the fluorescence of dissolved organic matter in the environment. The project will focus on the potential effects of concentration on the intensity and yields for the fluorescence under different environmental conditions.


fernandorosario.wordpress.com
None

Very little supervision; student will need to work largely independently
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - Natural-Fiber Composites for Construction Wil Srubar

wsrubar@colorado.edu







This fundamental project will explore the design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization of natural-fiber composites for construction applications. The student will be responsible for manufacturing composite specimens using hot-press or wet-layup techniques and characterizing initial material properties (e.g., mechanical, physical, thermal). We will investigate the time-dependent aging of composites and predict their service-life using accelerated weathering methods. The project will focus primarily on gelatin- and poly-lactic acid-based, woven natural-fiber composites. However, depending on preliminary results and student interest, the course of study may also include 3D-printed biofoams for thermal insulation. The student can expect to learn the fundamentals of novel materials research, to work under the supervision of the PI, and collaborate with a team of graduate student mentors. The student will also learn to effectively communicate their research results via informal group meetings and public presentations.


http://spot.colorado.edu/~wisr7047
This project is intended for undergraduates in their junior or senior year who have taken fundamental courses in chemistry, calculus, statics, and mechanics of materials.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CEAE - The Colorado Science Technology Engineering Math Student Enhancement Laboratory John Zhai
(303) 492-4699
john.zhai@colorado.edu







This proposal is trying to promote a new way to proactively fill the gap in Colorado’s STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education for rural and underserved urban young learners and post-secondary students in response to the United States’ initiative to prepare the 21st century workforce. Specifically, this proposes to develop a master plan for a general research laboratory in Colorado with STEM programming accessible to Colorado students and faculty—ranging from middle through community college undergraduate schools throughout the state. The planning and designing tasks will be performed to improve and refine the existing building design to house the STEM SEL and integrate groups (student and educators/faculty) into the STEM SEL via a cascading plan.


None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily theoretical, most work on paper/electronic medium
Some prior work; student will build on work of others

Projects offered by Computer Science

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
CS - Validating Android Apps Bor-Yuh Chang

bec@cs.colorado.edu







The Android framework is complex, making it extremely difficult to difficult to develop apps that work as intended. For example, it is quite easy to write an app that unexpected crashes your phone by misusing the framework. The goal of this project is to develop tools and algorithms that find and fix defects in Android apps.


http://pl.cs.colorado.edu/projects/thresher/
Looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated student with strong programming skills. Experience with building compiler-like tools is beneficial. The student will have the opportunity to learn about the design of program analysis tools.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Studying User Interfaces and Visualizations for Reasoning Assistants Bor-Yuh Chang

bec@cs.colorado.edu







Developing programs that work as intended is hard, right? One reason is that the developer has to mentally simulate what the program will do when executed. Wouldn’t it be great if we had development tools that did this simulation for you and could show you what might go wrong even before you have executable code?!? This project will explore building a front-end for a program analyzer that infers properties about dynamic data structures. The goal of this project is to present analysis results during development time in a manner useful to the programmer and to study the effectiveness of doing so. To the program developer, the completed system might look like an online and symbolic debugger that could highlight potential errors in program fragments.


Looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated student with strong programming skills. Experience with building user interfaces and/or compiler-like tools is beneficial but not required. The student will have the opportunity to learn about the design of program analysis tools.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Taming Dynamic Languages Bor-Yuh Chang

bec@cs.colorado.edu







Love JavaScript? Hate that there are few development tools for it? Dynamic languages like JavaScript are extremely flexible leading to a proliferation of very powerful frameworks. At the same, this flexibility is what makes tools for these languages so difficult to build and so poor in general. The goal of this project is to codify the idioms that framework developers use in the form of types or other kinds of specifications and design tools and checkers that support these idiomatic uses of dynamic languages.


http://pl.cs.colorado.edu/projects/fissile/
Looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated student with strong programming skills. Experience with compiler-like tools is beneficial. The student will have the opportunity to learn about the design of program analysis tools.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Smart Materials/Electronic Textiles for Wearable Technology and Novel Interfaces Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
ncorrell@colorado.edu

Halley Profita

halley.profita@colorado.edu


(303) 717-1436
Student will help in the development of novel textile forms of wearable technology using microcontrollers and networked hardware. New form factors, gesture interfaces, and smart material construction will be explored. We would like to develop smart materials and interaction techniques (wearable technology) for multiple applications including military, art, assistive technology, music, etc.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
Would like: Programming or electronics skills Would like: Machining, CAD, building/shop, or fabrication skills

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - The Droplets: A Distributed Robot Platform for Multi-Agent Learning Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu

Anshul Kanakia
(309) 472-4114
kanakia@colorado.edu



The Droplet swarm robot platform is envisioned to be a scalable robotics experimentation environment. The hardware component comprises of the actual robot and the test bed/floor that experiments are run on. The robots are Ping-Pong ball sized devices capable of sensing (RGB color and IR sensing), actuation using vibration motors and communication, using analog/digital IR sensors. The student will help with design and development of the robots and their embedded software as well as a software physics-based simulator. While both, the hardware platform and simulator are already in active use, the student will help in further development and enhancement of robot capabilities as well as apply complex distributed learning algorithms to this multi-agent system. The student will also help in developing informational material such as tutorials and presentations explaining the platform to the wider academic community.


https://github.com/correlllab/cu-droplet
Embedded Programming, C/C++ Programming, Hardware and Soldering Skills

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CS - Smart Materials/Electronic Textiles for Wearable Technology and Novel Interfaces Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu

Halley Profita

halley.profita@colorado.edu



Student will help in the development of novel textile forms of wearable technology using microcontrollers and networked hardware. New form factors, gesture interfaces, and smart material construction will be explored. We would like to develop smart materials and interaction techniques (wearable technology) for multiple applications including military, art, assistive technology, music, etc.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=2353
GEEN 1400 Would like: Programming or electronics skills Would like: Machining, CAD, building/shop, or fabrication skills

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Distributed Algorithms for Reconfigurable Self-Organizing Smart Wall Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu

Nicholas Farrow

nicholas.farrow@colorado.edu



The focus of this apprenticeship is to investigate controlling large scale swarm robotic structures by programming swarm algorithms at the individual node level. The student will be working with the lab's Amorphous Facade project which uses reconfigurable hexagonal blocks for the swarm nodes. The student will investigate various algorithms and methods of routing data and control signals between nodes, creating distributed user interfaces, as well programming the nodes to predict user behaviors. There will be many opportunities for the student to choose their own research path with this project, as well as to develop new block types for integration with the current library of blocks.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=574
Some experience with basic electronics and microcontroller programming will be helpful, but are not required. Experience with C/C++ programming is required.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
CS - Multilayer composite materials with embedded sensing and distributed computation Nikolaus Correll
(303) 717-1436
ncorrell@colorado.edu







Our group has developed a small scale distributed computing platform (less than 1in2) that is equipped with an Atmel Xmega microcontroller, an accelerometer, LEDs and other sensors, and can be networked with up to four neighbors to create large lattices of microcontrollers. We wish to investigate integrating this network into composites to create, e.g., airplane wings that can measure windspeed and forces across them. The DLA will work with grad students in our lab to experiment with composite materials, test them for durability, and collect experimental data, e.g., in the ITLL wind tunnel.


http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
Experience in making your own glass and carbon fiber composites is advantageous.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Biologically Realistic Visualization of the Transcriptional Regulation Process Robin Dowell
(303) 492-8204
robin.dowell@colorado.edu

David Knox

david.knox@Colorado.EDU



The Dowell Lab has a summer project to create animations of a biological process for entry into the National Science Foundation’s international contest for visualization. This project is looking for undergraduate participation in the design and creation of animations that depict individual molecules interacting with DNA. Our final results will be entered into the National Science Foundation’s “International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge” held every September. The ongoing goal for this project is the creation of an educational tool for teaching the dynamics and stochastic nature of transcriptional regulation. This summer’s project is to explore possible animation techniques, which plays a major role in making the tool both engaging and educational. Future projects will build on the animation methods to build a prototype teaching tool that will be integrated in biology classes here at CU.


http://dowell.colorado.edu/project-modeling.html
We are looking for students with computer programming experience. Applicants must have successfully completed course work through Data Structures (CSCI 2270) and be able to independently create computer applications. Knowledge of Computer Systems (CSCI 2400), Algorithms (CSCI 3104), and biology are also preferred. Experience in education or educational computer games is also a plus. This project is a group effort requiring excellent communication skills.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Custos - Building a System for Secure Digital Data Storage and Access Control Dirk Grunwald
(720) 310-5430
dirk.grunwald@colorado.edu

Andy Sayler
(617) 299-1597
andy.sayler@colorado.edu



The magnitude of the digital data we create, store, and interact with on a daily basis is rapidly increasing. Simultaneously, we are demanding increasingly diverse use cases for our data: from syncing it across a variety of devices to sharing it with a multitude of collaborators. Securing our data and controlling who can access it is thus increasingly important, but also increasingly difficult. In order to create simpler system for securing and managing our digital data, we are building Custos: a key:value object store with a flexible authentication layer and powerful access control semantics. We are seeking a student to help us continue the design and development of the Custos software ecosystem. This role would involve designing and building software as part of the larger Custos project. There are multiple development areas within Custos (e.g. file system work, web front-end work, etc), and we are willing to work with the student to pick an area that they feel most interested in working on. Custos is Free Software and all submissions will be released under a FLOSS license. Questions? Contact Andy Sayler (andy.sayler@colorado.edu). Details at http://www.andysayler.com/output/.


http://www.andysayler.com/output/
+ Moderate to Advanced Programming Experience (ideally Python, C, and/or Go) + Basic Operating System Knowledge (ideally Linux) + Basic Computer Security Knowledge (desirable, but not required) + Basic Cryptography Knowledge (desirable, but not required) + Basic File System Knowledge (desirable, but not required) + Web Programming Experience (optional) + Linux Kernel Programming Experience (optional)

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Scientific application performance on the Intel MIC Henry Tufo

tufo@cs.colorado.edu

Pate Motter
(918) 261-6936
pate.motter@colorado.edu



In the area of high-performance computing, one area that has been growing is the use of accelerators in systems. These accelerators (Intel MIC, GPGPUs) can perform certain operations more efficiently and faster than a CPU. There is still a debate on the true benefits of these accelerators. This project will examine the performance benefits of several existing scientific applications on the Intel MIC architecture (Xeon Phi). These applications are still being determined but would likely consist of projects like the bioinformatics code, BLAST among others. The student will work with CU faculty, staff, and graduate students to research methods to characterize the performance of various parallel applications. The performance can be characterized in many ways (cache hits/misses, FLOPS, energy efficiency, etc.). If certain applications do not meet expectations on the MIC, the root cause would need to be found.


Knowledge of the Unix/Linux environment is required. Knowledge of parallel computing (threading, MPI) is needed. The student should be familiar with programming in C/C++.

Very little supervision; student will need to work largely independently
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Characterizing Infrastructure Cloud Performance for Scientific Computing Henry Tufo

tufo@cs.colorado.edu







Infrastructure clouds, such as Amazon EC2, provide virtual resources on-demand, allowing users to deploy custom software stacks. Resource providers, however, typically oversubscribe the underlying hardware, deploying VMs from multiple users on the same physical systems that share CPU, storage, and network resources. Despite the isolation provided by VMs, one user’s applications can negatively impact other users, especially if the applications are I/O intensive. Currently, users must choose cloud infrastructures for their deployments based on limited information, such as their cost; up-to-date performance information is not available to users. The student will work with CU faculty, staff, and graduate students to research methods to characterize the performance of cloud providers. Performance data will be gathered and provided to users, allowing them to choose appropriate cloud infrastructures. One possible solution, for example, may periodically provision resources across different clouds, execute a set of simulations and benchmarks that represent common scientific workloads, and publish both up-to-date and historic performance data via an interactive Web application.


https://github.com/cu-csc/automaton
Experience with UNIX/Linux is required. Experience with a high-level language, such as Java or Python, is highly beneficial. Experience with cloud computing tools (virtualization, web services), cloud computing toolkits or providers (Nimbus, OpenStack, Amazon EC2), and web development technologies (Django) is helpful.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Active Authentication for Mobile Devices Tom Yeh

tom.yeh@colorado.edu







The student will take part in an ongoing research project to develop a new modality for active authentication for mobile devices. The student will participate in weekly project meetings. The student will gain exposure to graduate-level research by working together with graduate students. The student will get the opportunity to contribute to the writing of research paper and to present research work at conferences.


Familiarity with the Android framework Experience with human subject research Experience with research methods for biometrics

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
CS - Automatic Program Analysis for Cybersecurity Project Tom Yeh
(240) 328-3490
tom.yeh@colorado.edu







Students will take part in an ongoing research on automatic program analysis for cybersecurity project. This project is funded by DoD. The project is still in an early stage. Students will work alongside with a team of faculty advisors and graduate students. Students will gain significant research experiences.


- 5 hour/week commitment - sophomore - at least one summer internship experience - strong programming background

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others



Projects offered by Electical, Computer, and Energy Engineering

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
ECEE - Automating Network Updates Pavol Cerny

pavol.cerny@colorado.edu







Configuration updates are a leading cause of instability in networks. A key factor that makes updates difficult to implement is that networks are distributed systems with hundreds or thousands of nodes all interacting with each other. Even if the initial and final configurations are correct, naively updating individual nodes can easily cause the network to exhibit incorrect behaviors such as forwarding loops, black holes, and security vulnerabilities. The goal of this project is to develop a new approach to the network update problem: automatically generate updates that are guaranteed to be correct. Knowledge of networking would be a plus, but it is not required. More information in http://ecee.colorado.edu/pavol/publications/synt13/synt13.pdf


http://ecee.colorado.edu/pavol/publications/synt13/synt13.pdf
Programming experience, discrete mathematics course such as ECEN 2703 or CSCI 2824.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
ECEE - Solar Forecasting Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu





Kim Newman
(303) 735-2287
Kimberly.Newman@colorado.edu
To optimally manage power grids energized by either dense or distributed photovoltaic (PV) sources at high levels of grid integration it is necessary to predict the direct and diffuse solar flux in near real time from a few minutes to several hours ahead and at high spatial resolutions of up to ~0.5 km. This project addresses these needs through the development and field demonstration of an optimized cloud and solar intensity (“insolation”) forecasting system based on both distributed ground-based sensors using smart phones and in situ PV power monitoring of solar array output. The system will provide real-time prediction of insolation on time and space scales relevant for operational power grid management. The system is being built and demonstrated in Boulder using deployable sensors developed under two CU capstone projects and funded by the CU Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute. Interest in field experimentation, sensor development, and weather forecasting, clouds, and renewable energy is important.


Interest in weather, use of smart phones, and renewable energy

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Remote Sensing from Unmanned Aircraft for Agriculture Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu

Eryan Dai
(303) 459-4266
eryan.dai@gmail.com

Maciej Stachura
(720) 335-7558
maciej.stachura@blackswifttech.com
CU and Black Swift Technologies are embarking upon a Phase II project involving development, testing, and field validation of a small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) with a highly capable passive microwave radiometer to provide soil moisture measurements over an area of up to ~400 acres per flight. Tight integration of the sensor with the sUAS avionics and airframe will enable precise flight control for low altitude missions in the range of 15m-30m above ground level (AGL) required for the sensor to accurately map soil moisture down to ~5cm in depth at up to a 15m resolution for agricultural purposes. Phase II involves building a modified removable nose cone for the UAS to house the sensor payload and converts the propulsion to a twin prop design on the wings. Phase II also includes the design of several new technologies, including a lightweight and low cost sensor board to measure both the infrared temperature of the ground and the Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI) and high speed mass memory based on SD RAM cards. The project will involve supporting the development and testing of these sensors and memory along with general help in integrating them into the UAS.


http://cet.colorado.edu
Interest in unmanned aircraft and environmental remote sensing. ECEN 3400 and 3410 are desirable.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Terahertz Radio Wave Propagation Albin Gasiewski
(303) 492-9688
al.gasiewski@colorado.edu

Larry Scally

Larry.Scally@coloradoengineeringinc.com



The focus of this project is a study of how electromagnetic waves in the frequency range from ~100 to 1000 GHz ("terahertz radio waves") propagate through the atmosphere. Specifically, we are interested in the impact of atmospheric turbulence and the associated fluctuations in the index of refraction in the air caused by this turbulence on the coherency of waves propagating across distances of kilometers. To study these effects CU has developed the Terahertz Atmospheric Ionospheric Propagation, Absorption, and Scattering" (TAIPAS) experiment. This experiment consists of a 325-340 GHz transmitter from the ECEE building to receivers at the Green Mesa site, and includes weather instrumentation, an optical scintillometer, and a radio telecommunications link. This project solicits help in running the TAIPAS system and in collecting and analyzing the data from the TAIPAS transmissometer, telescopes, and weather sensors. An interest in radio waves and experience in using Linux and Windows computers is important for this work.


http://cet.colorado.edu
ECEN 3400 and ECEN 3410 are important for this work.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Investigating asymmetry of focused laser beams Juliet Gopinath
(303) 492-5568
Juliet.gopinath@colorado.edu

Robert Niederriter

robert.niederriter@colorado.edu



One of the most important practical features of laser beams is the ability to focus to very small spots. Typically, the laser beam sizes in front of and behind the focal point are equal. In certain laser beams, however, we observe asymmetric focusing behavior that is not explained by theory. Such asymmetry complicates uses of focused laser beams (i.e. almost all uses of lasers), the measurement of laser beam quality, and applications such as microscopy and imaging. We have developed and simulated an a theory to explain the phenomenon. A Discovery Learning Apprentice would work towards experimental verification of asymmetric focusing. The Apprentice would construct, align, and analyze an experiment based on simple optical elements such as a laser, lenses, and mirrors. The Apprentice may contribute to further work using simulations or experiments to explore other explanations of the observed asymmetric focusing or methods to quantify the measured asymmetry. The Apprentice’s work may lead to a conference and or journal publication.


ecee.colorado.edu/~julietg
A course in electromagnetics is required. (PHYS 3310 or ECEN 3400) Experience in experimental optics would be very beneficial but is not required.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Effects of transients in multimode erbium-doped fiber communication systems Juliet Gopinath
(303) 492-5568
julietg@colorado.edu







The majority of communications today is transmitted using single mode fiber (SMF). However, capacity limits of SMF are generating interest in alternate cost-efficient, high-bandwidth solutions. An attractive option is offered by space division multiplexing in which data is transmitted over parallel channels utilizing different spatial patterns of light (orthogonal spatial modes of the fiber). There has been very little work on examining the transient effects of adding and dropping channels in such multimode communications systems. The Discovery Learning Apprentice would work towards simulating these effects in a fiber amplifier, and then, verifying the results of the simulations with laboratory optical experiments. It is hoped that the Apprentice’s work will lead to a journal or conference publication.


ecee.colorado.edu/~julietg
A course , or at the minimum, enrollment in an electromagnetics is required. (PHYS 3310 or ECEN 3400)

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Geomathematics and Remote Sensing Ute Herzfeld
(303) 492-9066
ute.herzfeld@colorado.edu







The topic of research is development and implementation of algorithms for analysis of remote sensing data. The geomathematics and remote sensing group is an active and interdisciplinary group with students from several majors. Applications are in new satellite instrumentation, including NASA's future mission, ICESat-2 and range to analysis of airborne and field data collected by us (including undergraduate students) in Alaska over Bering Glacier. While most of the day-to-day work is computational (code development, mathematical data analysis), applications are in glaciers and ice streams, sea ice, ecology, atmosphere and other parts of the Earth system. Students work together with grad students,other undergraduates and the faculty advisor, who is a Research Professor in ECEE, a Senior Research Associate at CIRES and an affilaite Professor in APPLIed Math. This is a great opportunity to learn about research, get experience and - if interested - find a topic for a Masters or PhD Thesis or present a paper.


Solid background in maths/applied maths and experience in coding/ computer programming. Interest in satellite remote sensing and snow & ice research and other Earth Sciences and Geophysics (Alaska, Greenland and Antarctica). Python, Matlab, C. High GPA and high dedication to academic work; enjoy working in a team (of professor and students). Available to work in blocks of at least 3 hours.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
mostly computer related, coding/analysis, but also field based
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Software-Defined Networking Eric Keller
(303) 492-0125
eric.keller@colorado.edu







A software-defined network runs network management services as software on a logically-centralized controller that uses a standard API (instead of proprietary, vendor-specific interfaces) to install packet-handling rules in the underlying network devices (e.g., switches). This offers offers unprecedented control over the data network and has been shown to be an architecture which is programmable and evolvable, and seen some great early success stories (Google’s backbone network is controlled this way). This project is not a single, specific project, but a category of projects that can go in a number of direction related to a number of ongoing research projects in the Next-generation Networks Group run by Professor Keller, and will be based on the student’s interests. Some topics included applications to cloud computing, integration of software-defined networking controllers in operating systems, extending the network edge into applications, namely streaming analytic platforms such as Storm, and enabling an agile network and computer security system which actively seeks out information, learns of threats, and dynamically modifies the network in response.


http://ngn.cs.colorado.edu/
None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Increasing the Agility of Network Security Eric Keller
(303) 492-0125
eric.keller@colorado.edu






(303) 492-0125
Today’s network security solutions are too rigid and typically confined to individual boxes on the network. This project will look at making network security more agile and programmable in general. To do this, the Bro network security monitor will likely play a central role in our exploration. Bro is a powerful and versatile network security system, that has aspects of attack detection, packet capture, traffic inspection, and event logging. This project will study the scalability, and other aspects of Bro. In particular, we will look to (i) provide an interface to Bro which provides the ability to interact with and dynamically change multiple Bro instances from a single controller, and (ii) integrate with programmable networking technology called software-defined networking.


Ideally, has experience with the Bro network security monitor.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Green Energy Storage Technology for Haiti Alan Mickelson
(303) 492-7539
mickel@schof.colorado.edu







Green Energy Storage Technology is a continuation of a three year funded research effort in Haiti. In an earlier part of this program, we teamed with The IEEE Foundation of Washington DC, The Neges Foundation of Leogane, Haiti, Sirona AS of Carrefour, Haiti, and the Enersa Corporation of Port-au-Prince, Haiti to bring energy independence to the Mon P'tit Village School compound in Leogane, Haiti while training local Haitian students in the rudiments of green energy. While preparing for final project for the Haitian energy class, we developed a Li-Ion battery pack for storing charge from either the energy grid or solar panels. We are presently refining out battery pack using the most recent environmentally friendly lithium ion technology with a goal of setting up a commercial production facility in Haiti. In this present phase of the work, we will build a prototype, test the prototype, find Haitian partners and develop a longer term business plan. We foresee the Discovery Learning Apprentice filling this position to most focused on the design and implementation of a 10 kW-H/day battery system.


http://outreach.colorado.edu/programs/details/id/423
Student should have some knowledge of renewable energy. Knowledge of some of the most recent types of battery development would be an advantage. The student must further be interested in sustainable development. Sustainable development requires technical, social and business expertise. The student must be willing to learn what is needed and have some desire to travel to a site in developing world for on-site testing if required. Knowledge of French and/or Creol a plus.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Gold Nanorod Bioconjugates for Bladder Cancer Detection and Treatment Wounjhang Park
(303) 735-3601
won.park@colorado.edu







The student will synthesize gold nanorods and fluorescent nanoparticles, couple them together via polymer linkers, conjugate with antibody protein that specifically targets bladder cancer cells. The student will also engage in treating the cancer cells with the synthesized bioconjugates and conducting various microscopy for characterizations. The student will work closely with a graduate student who has been working on this project for several years.


None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Graphical Interface for Numerical Analysis using the Janus Supercomputer Melinda Piket-May

Melinda.Piket-May@colorado.edu







The main objective of this research project is to completely model electrically large electromagnetic (EM) problems with minimal numerical dispersion and minimal computing time with a graphical user interface (GUI) interface for quick automated post processing of the EM phenomena being modeled. The second order time and space finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm is one standard method for solving such problems, but has a fundamental numerical dispersion handicap. The recently developed second order in time, fourth order in space finite volume (FV24) algorithm effectively cancels out FDTD’s numerical dispersion. The FV24 algorithm itself is currently implemented in the Fortran 90 programming language. Graphical processing units (GPUs) are used to execute the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) Fortran parallel implementation of the FV24 algorithm. Cutting-edge GPUs are evaluated for use with FV24 to reduce the algorithm’s execution time. This project will work with optimizing the code to run on multiple CPU's and GPU's. It will also work with developing a Graphical User Interface for the system.


A strong programming background. The student must have an interest in high performance computing. A knowledge of FORTRAN/FORTRAN90 and CUDA are helpful but not necessary.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Silicon photonics 2: on-chip optical devices and circuits Milos Popovic
(303) 492-5304
milos.popovic@colorado.edu







Silicon photonics refers to optical (microphotonic) “circuits” on chip. This technology is surpassing microelectronics in applications such as telecom and datacom, energy-efficient on-chip networks for manycore processors and CPU-memory communication, high-speed A/D conversion, imaging, quantum computing. Microelectronic circuits include transmission wires, L-C resonators, transistors. Microphotonic circuits comprise sub-micron optical waveguides (“wires”) that guide laser light, microring resonators and photonic crystals, electro-optic modulators, and wacky concepts like slow-light memory cells and loss avoiding nanostructures. You (the undergrad) will participate in a tightly integrated team working on the world’s first photonics in advanced CMOS fabrication processes for CPU-memory communication. You will work on design and/or experimental measurements of photonic devices, with help from graduate students. You will use standard electronics design tools (Cadence), and custom simulation codes (FDTD, mode solvers) to design photonic devices, have them built in the world’s most advanced CMOS fabrication processes like IBM 45nm SOI, or develop and do experimental measurements.


plab.colorado.edu
Top grades, strong motivation. This isn't a job for a few hours a week pay, the main thing you are getting is exposure to a cutting edge research field; in return I expect strong commitment.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Can be primarily theoretical (design/code), experimental (lab/measurements) or both.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Silicon photonics 3: on-chip optical devices and circuits Milos Popovic
(303) 492-5304
milos.popovic@colorado.edu







Silicon photonics is described in the other two posts on these three positions. You (the undergrad) will participate in a project involving the device and chip design and/or characterization of optical devices and circuits on chip designed for one of the following applications: energy efficient CPU-to-memory communication to extend the Moore's Law scaling of compute power; quantum photonic circuits on chip for quantum encryption and computation (collaboration with NIST); or building light-force (radiation pressure) based devices on chip. We also work in the integration of photonics into advanced CMOS (32nm node, 45nm node) microelectronics processes, and positions are available to build photonics into the standard Cadence microelectronics design software flow -- i.e. build parametrized cells ("p-cells") for optical microring resonator modulators, detectors, full transmitters, etc. So, from industry relevant technology, to funky far out devices.. specific project to be decided after meeting with candidate, based on capabilities and interests.


plab.colorado.edu
Top grades, strong motivation. This isn't a job for a few hours a week pay, the main thing you are getting is exposure to a cutting edge research field; in return I expect strong commitment.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Can be primarily theoretical (design/code), experimental (lab/measurements) or both.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ECEE - Silicon photonics: on-chip optical devices and circuits Milos Popovic
(303) 492-5304
milos.popovic@colorado.edu







Silicon photonics refers to optical (microphotonic) “circuits” on chip. This technology is surpassing microelectronics in applications such as telecom and datacom, energy-efficient on-chip networks for manycore processors and CPU-memory communication, high-speed A/D conversion, imaging, quantum computing. Microelectronic circuits include transmission wires, L-C resonators, transistors. Microphotonic circuits comprise sub-micron optical waveguides (“wires”) that guide laser light, microring resonators and photonic crystals, electro-optic modulators, and wacky concepts like slow-light memory cells and loss avoiding nanostructures. You (the undergrad) will participate in a tightly integrated team working on the world’s first photonics in advanced CMOS fabrication processes for CPU-memory communication. You will work on design and/or experimental measurements of photonic devices, with help from graduate students. You will use standard electronics design tools (Cadence), and custom simulation codes (FDTD, mode solvers) to design photonic devices, have them built in the world’s most advanced CMOS fabrication processes like IBM 45nm SOI, or develop and do experimental measurements.


plab.colorado.edu
Top grades, strong motivation. This isn't a job for a few hours a week pay, the main thing you are getting is exposure to a cutting edge research field; in return I expect strong commitment.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Can be primarily theoretical (design/code), experimental (lab/measurements) or both.
Some prior work; student will build on work of others

Projects offered by Physics




Projects offered by Environmental Engineering

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
EVEN - Environmental Fate and Transport of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemical Additives Joseph Ryan
(303) 492-0772
joseph.ryan@colorado.edu

Jessica Dehart

jessica.dehart@colorado.edu



The objective of this project is to design a lab experiment to measure the fate and transport of several contaminants used frequently as additives in hydraulic fracturing fluids. An example of a possible experiment would be to investigate if glutaraldehyde, a frequently used biocide, slows down the biodegradation of other fracturing fluid additives. The student will assist in designing a laboratory experiment to monitor the degradation of the different compounds. The student will collect samples and perform the necessary analysis for the experiment, gaining experience both in basic lab skills and more advanced analytical methods including gas chromatography. The results of this experiment will be integrated into water quality research conducted under the five-year AirWaterGas NSF study. The student will have opportunities to participate in other aspects of the AirWaterGas NSF study. These opportunities may include attending grant events and presentations or opportunities to conduct field work collecting groundwater samples for other water quality projects conducted by the project.


www.airwatergas.org
(1) Completion of or enrollment in CVEN 4424 Environmental Organic Chemistry, (2) Availability to work two 5-hour time blocks per week, (3) Interest in the environmental effects of oil and gas development and (4) Comfort working with corrosive chemicals, strong acids, and trace metals including mercury with proper supervision and safety procedures.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
EVEN - Environmental Fate of Trace Metals: Role of Dissolved Organic Matter Redox State Joseph Ryan
(303) 492-0772
joseph.ryan@colorado.edu

Brett Poulin

brett.poulin@colorado.edu



The environmental fate of trace metals is a topic of considerable interest for natural resource management. Dissolved organic matter is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and strongly binds trace metals influencing metal transport and bioavailability. Environments that are important for trace metal cycling, namely wetlands and riparian zones, exhibit variable redox conditions. Local precipitation events or seasonal fluctuations in water table height result in changes in the redox state of soils, sediments, and surface waters. Fluctuations in redox state are recognized as important for trace metal mobilization and transformation. However, it is not well understood how redox fluctuations influence the interactions between dissolved organic matter and trace metals. This research project will investigate how the redox state of dissolved organic matter influences the fate of trace metals (e.g., copper, mercury). Laboratory experiments will evaluate changes in trace metal speciation under different redox conditions in the presence of dissolved organic matter. The results will improve the understanding of land and water use changes on the fate and transport of trace metals.


(1) Completion of or enrollment in CVEN 4404 Water Chemistry, (2) Availability to work two 5-hour time blocks per week, (3) Interest in dissolved organic matter, trace metal cycling, and geochemistry, experimental design, and analysis of results and (4) Comfort working with corrosive chemicals, strong acids, and trace metals including mercury with proper supervision and safety procedures.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others

Projects offered by Mechanical Engineering

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
ME - Tissue biomechanics - relating microstructure, composition and function Virginia Ferguson
(303) 735-5232
virginia.ferguson@colorado.edu

TBD TBD





The DLA student in this position will be tasked with evaluating the mechanical properties of biological tissues collected from mice. The student will also perform assays to evaluate tissue biochemistry and microscopy to determine how the constituents and organization of the structural matrix within the tissue (the extracellular matrix) contributes to the overall tissue mechanical behavior. A major component of this DLA project will include development of a novel mechanical testing method and writing Matlab code to evaluate the resulting mechanical testing data. Students with knowledge of numerical methods and analysis, familiarity with Solidworks and the principles of engineering design, and the basics of mechanics of solids (such as beam bending, moments of inertia, etc.) is highly desired.


https://sites.google.com/a/colorado.edu/bbl/
Junior or senior in mechanical engineering or similar discipline; completed courses in Statics, Mechanics of Solids; possess some Matlab programming experience. It is highly desired that students must be able to work in 2 five hour blocks per week. It is preferable that the student has taken a college level physiology or biology course.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
ME - Polymer thermal ground planes for thin flexible electronics Y.C. Lee

leeyc@colorado.edu

Ryan Lewis
(509) 438-3587
rjlewis@colorado.edu



As electronic devices become thinner, thermal management is becoming a critical issue. And in the push for flexible electronics, traditional methods of heat removal are becoming more challenging. Our group is developing ultra thin, flexible thermal ground planes using microfabricated polymer heat pipes, which utilize phase change and convection of encapsulated liquids to improve the effective thermal conductivity. Major challenges associated with this project include hermetic sealing with atomic layer deposition (ALD) inorganic barrier films, design of flexible structures to enable a 90-degree bend without cracking, developing wicking structures with hydrophilic ALD films. Research tasks will be associated with the microfabrication, assembly, testing, and characterization of the thermal transport and device flexibility. This project will provide training in polymer device microfabrication and assembly, thermal and fluid device characterization, and design of microsystems for thermal management.


None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Ventilation System Measurements in Investigations of Infectious Disease Transmission shelly miller
(303) 492-0587
shelly.miller@colorado.edu







Infectious diseases cause thousands of deaths annually and cost billions of dollars in lost productivity. Few reports have documented that specific building-related factors are associated with the increased risk of infections. These building-related factors include type of HVAC system, ventilation rates, pressure distributions between rooms, air-mixing patterns within the environment, and the presence of control technologies such as filtration. This project seeks to assess the current understanding of the role that HVAC systems play in airborne pathogen transmission and to identify the key parameters associated with buildings that may impact airborne pathogen transmission. Measurements will be made to assess the ventilation system relationship to disease transmission.


Junior or senior standing

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily field based, requiring hands-on work in the field
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Algae milking John Pellegrino
(303) 735-2631
john.pellegrino@colorado.edu







We are evaluating growing algae as a potential living "photocatalyst" to continuously use photons and water to create useful fuel precursors (like sugars) that are secreted into the aqueous growth medium. A key part of this is growing the algae and continuously dialyzing the growth reactor to remove both the product and any opportunistic bacteria. The DLA project is to run our experimental system to perform the dialysis and determine the rate of dialysis needed to keep the algae from being "crashed" by bacterial contamination.


Must have completed 5 semesters in their major.

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
ME - Adhesion and Traction Performance Measurements for Micro-Patterned Treads Mark Rentschler

mark.rentschler@colorado.edu

Madalyn Kern

madalyn.kern@colorado.edu



This project focuses on measuring adhesion and traction properties of micro-patterned treads. This project is sponsored by NSF. The adhesive and tractive properties of micro-patterned materials are being studied to help lead us to a more effective robotic capsule colonoscope for routine colonoscopies. During this apprenticeship, you will be working closely with doctoral students already working in these areas. The apprenticeship will focus heavily on experimental evaluation of adhesive and tractive properties of these treads as we explore different tread geometries and profiles along with varying substrate properties. As an apprentice, you will also be asked to assist with additional experiments related to this overall project and assist with tread design for prototype robotic capsule colonoscopes.


http://www.colorado.edu/mechanical/amtl/
None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Robotic Capsule Colonoscope Design and Experimental Evaluation Mark Rentschler

mark.rentschler@colorado.edu

Joseph Prendergast

joseph.prendergast@colorado.edu



This project focuses on designing, fabricating and experimentally testing a robotic capsule colonoscope. Currently, conventional colonoscopies can be painful for the patient and cumbersome for the physician. Patient pain is leading to increasingly heavy sedation, which results in significant costs increase. A robotic capsule colonoscope can be used to significantly reduce patient pain and improve physician control during the procedure. During this apprenticeship, you will be working closely with doctoral students already working on robotic capsule colonoscope design. The apprenticeship will focus heavily on mechanical and mechatronic design and capsule integration, coupled with fabrication and ultimately device experimental evaluation.


http://www.colorado.edu/mechanical/amtl/
None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Controlling Interface Chemistry with Surface Acoustic Waves Conrad Stoldt
(303) 492-7698
stoldt@colorado.edu





Todd Murry
(303) 492-7236
todd.murray@colorado.edu
Strain is well known to affect surface chemical kinetics and offers an attractive route towards the creation of tailored catalytic surfaces, where the reaction kinetics are altered through the controlled introduction of local strain fields. Indeed, there have been a number of studies indicating that surface strains induced through simple mechanical means or transient elastic waves influence surface adsorption, the yield of catalytic reactions, and reaction selectivity. In the case of elastic wave excitation, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are well suited for producing localized surface strain, as they are confined to propagate in the near surface region. There have been several reports indicating that SAWs do have a modest influence on surface chemistry. Thus far, however, the extent to which it is possible to control reaction kinetics using SAWs remains an open question. To date, a very limited number of reactions have been studied over a small SAW parameter space; low frequencies and small strain. Given the potential impact of SAW controlled surface chemistry, we propose to study the effects of SAW induced strain fields on several well understood surface reactions.


Junior level standing, available to work in 2-3 hour blocks

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea
ME - Development of Pro-healing Nanofibrous Coating on Arterial Stent Wei Tan
(303) 492-0239
wtan@colorado.edu







Arterial stent is a type of vascular implants, which has been widely used to treat a number of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular diseases, stroke and aneurysm. However, arterial restenosis after the stent treatment remains a major reason that lead to the device failure, even after recent development of various drug-eluting stents that use chemo- therapy agents to inhibit tissue growth contributing to restenosis. The major cause that initiates restenosis, however, is due to vascular cell damage. To that end, we aim to develop a novel multilayered nanofiber coating made of biocompatible polymers. This study will mainly involve experimental work of material electrospinning, chemical and mechanical characterization and adhesion tests of the coating under flow. It may also involve some cell culture and cell-related tests.


None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily by graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Design and microfabrication of smart stretchable electronics Jianliang Xiao
(303) 492-5428
Jianliang.Xiao@colorado.edu







Recent advancement in materials and mechanics has created a novel type of electronic system, i.e. stretchable electronics, that offers the prominent performance of conventional semiconductor circuits, but retains the mechanical properties of a rubber band. Therefore, stretchable electronics can be used in many places that are impossible for conventional electronics that exists today, such as flexible display, foldable circuits, bio-integrated diagnostic devices, and artificial skin. The goal of this apprenticeship is to use photolithogrphy and microfabrication technologies to design and fabricate electronic devices, which will be integrated with soft active materials to create smart stretchable electronics. Smart stretchable electronics can actively repond to environmental stimulus, such as temperature, humidity, electrical and magnetic fields, and therefore can have many novel applications. The apprentice will learn how to use state-of-the-art tools to design and fabricate microelectronic devices, and transfer printing techniques for integration with soft materials.


None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
ME - Micro/Nano-Structured Surface for Thermal Management of High Power Electronics Ronggui Yang
(303) 735-1003
Ronggui.Yang@Colorado.Edu

Steven Isaacs

Steven.Isaacs@Colorado.Edu


(303) 735-1003
Overheating is becoming a bottleneck for high power electronic systems. The waste heat needs to be managed, through appropriate system design and technology innovations. Micro/Nanotechnologies offer great opportunities in significantly enhancing heat transfer capabilities. Our research group is one of the world leaders in micro/nano-enabled thermal management technologies. In one of the research directions, we use micro-machining techonlogy to fabricate micro/nano-structured surfaces. These surfaces significantly alter the fluid behavior when in they are in contact with fluids, such as contact angle change. Such surfaces can then be integrated with electronics for enhanced thermal management. The student is recruited to work together with a team of post-doctors and Ph.D students to develop and characterize such structured surfaces for thermal management of high power electronics. The student will not only learn micro/nano-fabrication and heat transfer characterization, but also learn how to conduct research and present research results.


http://spot.colorado.edu/~yangr
None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others
ME - Novel Thermal Interface Materials using Nanowire Arrays and Nanowire Networks Ronggui Yang
(303) 735-1003
Ronggui.Yang@Colorado.Edu

Shanshan Xu

Shanshan.Xu@Colorado.edu



Overheating is becoming a bottleneck for high power electronic systems. The waste heat needs to be managed, through appropriate system design and technology innovations. Micro/Nanotechnologies offer great opportunities in significantly enhancing heat transfer capabilities. Our research group is one of the world leaders in micro/nano-enabled thermal management technologies. In this particular research projects, we explore the usage of nanowire arrays and nanowire networks of carbon, metal, and silicon as high performance thermal interface materials. These nanowire materials can be of high thermal conductivity but high compliance to replace the silicone thermal grease used in the CPU-heat sink assembly to more effectively cool down high power electronics. Our lab have developed the capability in manufacturing different forms of such nanostructured materials. The student will be advised on thermal and mechanical characterization of such nanostructured materials to unlock the potential of these materials for advanced thermal interface material applications. The student will be involved in both publications and patent applications.


http://spot.colorado.edu/~yangr
None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Well-established body of work; student will refine/improved upon efforts of others

Projects offered by Colorado Space Grant

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
CSGC - Radiometer or RF Engineer for a CubeSat payload to understand climate change Brian Sanders
(303) 492-5451
brian.sanders@colorado.edu







The student will work with a team of graduate and undergraduate students to build a system to better understand climate change. This CubeSat payload will provide greater atmospheric temperature resolution and will be able to map polar ice regions. The student will refine the MiniRad payload for a satellite system approaching design and testing phases by understanding remote sensing and a passive microwave radiometer. Or a student will work with the communications team to develop a software defined radio. Both the digital and analog systems will be tested and the design finalized.


http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/allstar-projects/polarcube
Fall 2014 Jr EE/ECE major standing or equivalent experience.

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily experimental, requiring hands-on work in a lab
Some prior work; student will build on work of others

Projects offered by Engineering Education

Project NameContact Name(s)Complete DescriptionRequirements
EnEd - Engineering Student and Alumni Perspectives on Social Responsibility Angela Bielefeldt
(303) 492-8433
angela.bielefeldt@colorado.edu

Greg Rulifson

Gregory.Rulifson@colorado.edu



A continuing study funded by the NSF to understand how engineers view social responsibility, from students through the workforce. The research combines quantitative survey data with qualitative information from open-ended survey questions and interviews. The study is expanding from 5 schools and 3 engineering majors to ~30 schools and all engineering majors.


None

Moderate amount of supervision and interaction with others
Supervision primarily a combination of faculty and graduate students
Nature of work is primarily computer-related, involving coding/analysis
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
EnEd - Can We Talk? Impacting student retention through facilitated conversations LaRuth McAfee
(303) 492-8809
laruth.mcafee@colorado.edu







This project seeks to understand and improve retention and success of undergraduate engineering students through facilitated discussions. Studies show that dialogues improve relationships and foster collaboration between students of different backgrounds, and increase students’ self-awareness. These outcomes all support student success and retention, and this project seeks to investigate dialogues at CU Engineering. As a new project, initial activities will include literature research on facilitated discussions, with a special focus on the impact on underrepresented minority and women engineering students. After laying this groundwork, further activities will include pilot studies on facilitated dialogues. Meeting regularly, you will assist in clarifying research questions, reviewing literature, developing instruments for new data collection, and collecting/analyzing existing and new assessment data to identify key aspects of facilitated dialogues that impact retention and success in engineering. Working with two researchers associated with the BOLD Center and the ITLL, you will learn to implement and analyze a variety of engineering education research methods.


None

Very little supervision; student will need to work largely independently
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is primarily theoretical, most work on paper/electronic medium
Some prior work; student will build on work of others
EnEd - When you grow up...? Improving flexibility in engineering choices at CU Boulder Malinda Zarske
(303) 735-0987
Malinda.Zarske@Colorado.EDU







Do you have academic interests outside of engineering? Do you relate to your peers who are not sure what they want to do after they earn their degree? Do you want to help our College grow in flexible degree options for its students? Today’s college-aged students are less inclined to stick with one job after graduation; however, our nation’s need for citizens with science and engineering literacy in all professions has never been more critical. General Engineering is a new undergraduate degree program in the College of Engineering and Applied Science at CU Boulder, which provides a customizable design-based degree for students looking for an interdisciplinary engineering degree with additional work in another area of interest, such as teaching, business, pre-med, or arts and media. In this DLA apprenticeship, you will develop and investigate a research question based on recruiting and community formation in the newly emerging General Engineering degree program. You will gain experience in research methods and data trending (a skill useful for process development). And, you will help shape the future by making recommendations on how to improve the College’s engineering experience.


None

Good deal of supervision; student will work as an integral part of a research team
Supervision primarily by faculty supervisor
Nature of work is a combination of several types of work.
No prior work; student will be starting from basic idea

 

If you have any questions or concerns about Discovery Learning Apprenticeships or your application, please contact Dan Watson.